• Don't overlook our Welcome Package, it contains many links to important and helpful information about functions at VHT like posting pictures and sending PMs (private messages), as well as finding the parts you need.

    AD

My warranty cards

ancientdad

Administrator
Staff member
Joined
May 22, 2020
Total Posts
24,017
Total likes
2,191
Location
Nature Coast, FL
I had a nice run of new Hondas when I first started riding at the start of high school. My Dad bought me a junk CA102 at age 14, and after a few 90s early in 10th grade (a CT200, then an S90 and a cobbled together CT200 engine in a Sachs frame with grafted on Ducati 250 forks as a dirt bike), I had a CA72 that got traded in on my first new bike, an SL175K0 during my first Honda shop job busting tires and putting together bikes out of the crate. That led to a run of stepping up to bigger new bikes with an SL350K1, then a CL450K4, then back to dirt bikes with an XL250K0, then a brief infatuation with the ATC90 followed by a new CB750K3 in the fall of '73. The warranty card for my CL450K4 was passed on to the new owner when I sold it with about 2500 miles on it and a month or so left of the 6 months coverage, but I did save the crate tag from the CL450 because I was allowed to buy it in the crate by the second Honda shop I worked for, and we took it home to put together in my Dad's garage - pretty cool for a 17 year old kid by then.

Warranty card SL175.jpg SL175Citrusclimb1.jpg

Warranty card SL350.jpg SL350K1.jpg (screenshot from Super 8 video, only still pic of the bike)

CL450 crate tag.jpg 1972 CL450K4.jpg

Warranty card XL250.jpg 1972 XL250.jpg (also in this video)

Warranty card ATC90.jpg ShopLUV3wheeler.jpg (in the back of my truck, also in this video)

Warranty card CB750.jpg scan0054.jpg

Warranty card CB360.jpg (picture of the 360 below)
 
Last edited:
That is very cool Tom, thanks for posting those. Amazing how you still have them all these years later. Great that you also have pictures of the bikes as well (most of them anyway). Love the one with the pickup! I don't have any photo evidence of my first bike (CT90) and I would love to have one now.
 
Yeah, I didn't mention the truck as I figured all could see the ATC90 in the back of it, but the '72 Chevy LUV was my first 4 wheeled vehicle right out of high school, $2580 out the door with the step bumper, aluminum wheels and wide tires on it (70 series front, 60 series rear). Oh, and an AM radio and I later added an 8 track player. :D My Dad co-signed on it, the one and only time he did, and when my cousin and I opened our modest Honda repair shop in January of '73 (me at age 18, he at 21) in the very building that picture is in front of, a 4 room bungalow on State Road 60 in Brandon FL (the only commercial property available at the time on the main road), the truck was taken over by the shop which allowed me to later buy the first CB750 new. Trading payments from the truck (about $60 a month for 3 years) to the 750 ($63 a month for 3 years, higher interest because I was young, only the truck as previous credit) was at least affordable... well, barely as we started our paychecks at $50 a week, $43.47 take home. :eek: The one remaining sticker of the 1000 we had made to stick everywhere, and of course on all of our customer's bikes we worked on. I thought they were all gone forever until I opened a small 2 drawer toolbox I've had since a teenager and saw this stuck inside the lid (along with an early triangular 450 sidecover emblem/sticker)

2018-08-09 17.20.32.jpg
 
All my bikes over the years

In chronological order from the start at age 14 (1968)

'65 CA102
TPrBUT4.jpg


'64 C110 (roller bought from junkyard, refurbished with CA102 engine swapped into it, no picture)

'66 CT200
zXe84XA.jpg


'66 S90 (with CL90 pipe)
E0ekMze.jpg


'64 Sachs 125(?), later with C200 engine swapped in
pj8UcGH.jpg


'69 SL90 off-road project bought with blown rod, 6mm Powroll stroked crank/2mm overbore (110cc), ET magneto built from stock stator (no picture)

'64 CA72
zpCFLuK.jpg


'66 CL160 given to me by my father to trade in, along with the CA72, for my first new bike (no picture)

'70 SL175K0 bought new
9k7OKFb.jpg


'71 SL350K1 bought new (screenshot from Super 8 video, no still picture taken)
Edpny1z.jpg


'72 CL450K4 bought new
4aXz145.jpg


'71 SL350K1 off-road only
g2Vg69p.jpg


'72 XL250K0 bought new
azNXLDQ.jpg


'72 ATC90 bought new
JDpWIYf.jpg


'73 CB750K3 bought new
qK9zRZU.jpg
 
'72 Z50 bought used as a play toy/pit bike (no picture)

'74 CB360G bought new
7QvvEzm.jpg


'70s CL450 drag bike, CB450K0 bottom end
OES7Zqa.jpg


'74 Hodaka 125 Wombat, bought new when our shop and Hodaka franchise closed (no picture)

'73 CB750K3 with custom paint, later a Kerker 4-1
2liuzCN.jpg


'75 GL1000 bought totaled
SXmZcZj.jpg


'73 CB350F with 400F tank/seat/exhaust (bike at left)
q44L8ly.jpg


'76 GL1000
XYYN8Bl.jpg


'78 CB750K8 with '76 CB750F tank/seat/molded spoiler and Kerker 4-1
JjjTGBY.png


'79 CBX with Denco 6-6, bought totaled
j78pupn.jpg


'84 VF700F bought new
yKS2o8c.jpg


'72 XL250 off-road
tRZFFnW.jpg


'80 CB650 (no picture)

'85 Kawasaki ZL900
XdXNx5t.jpg


'80 CBX with Denco 6-6, factory GP kit
W75exuI.jpg
 
'77 CB750F bought not running and sold before completion (no picture)

'84 VF1100S
nrkvDCd.jpg


'73 CL450K5 bought like this
4ZNCP3P.jpg


and rebuilt to this
u6BZPsf.jpg


'74 CB450K6 drag bike, K0 bottom end, still under construction
egHwIuY.jpg


'69 CB350K1 project on deck, needs engine overhaul
Mt52mn9.jpg


'82 CB900F awaiting freshly rebuilt carbs by LDR and stock airbox to be reinstalled
MCtpg8l.jpg


'95 H-D Heritage Softail Classic "garage find" flipped for a really nice profit
MkMyrsW.jpg
 
According to my count you are a 33rd degree Honda Master. Dig that B&W SL350 off road only shot.
Thanks for sharing all this.
 
I agree, he remains worthy : 33rd*SENSEI

..earlier tonight I gawked at an identical '72 trike he revealed his momma riding above that's currently for sale on BaT.

..and just 2 days ago I happened upon a CBX-6 just like his black-tanked one above currently for sale on fleabay (asking $18k) with Kei Hin CR-"racing only" carbs that made me want to ask SENSEI for everything he could tell me about these unheard/unknown-of-to-me CR-"Racing Only" KeiHin carbs.
At first sight I thought: "Did someone mount some CR-motocross bike carbs on that thing ?!"

..and that bigboys GL-1 liter in yellow with the playful-whale? illustrated on the side covers had me wonder: "Is it really that large of a mammal ?"

..and that '75 CL450K5 also in yellow (albeit a richer and glossy one) with those killer M1919 machine-gun-looking exhaust pipers - SO FREAKING COOL !

Full disclosure : super jealous, and again, WOW !, and What have I done to deserve such awesomeness His Highness brings here ?
 
Full disclosure : super jealous, and again, WOW !, and What have I done to deserve such awesomeness His Highness brings here ?

Let's not get too carried away, it's just a list of bikes owned along the path life took me. I am proud of many of them because of all the work my father and I put into them to make them the enjoyable rides they were, but I could not have had half of them had it not been for the huge advantage of being my father's son. And let's not forget, the real Sensei here is Steve (66Sprint), his knowledge far and away exceeds anything I've reached in my life.

But I did have a nice run of both new and totaled/rebuilt bikes that allowed me to own many things I'd never been able to afford otherwise. And I always enjoy sharing anything my father was so good at.
 
Very cool thread, Tom! That ATC90 looks like it would almost float on those tires, but I'm guessing stability would be an issue if it did.

Thanks Brody. I never tried it, but I worked with a guy back then who did and yes, if extremely careful you can go across a pond but if you somehow get it tilted just the slightest it capsizes quickly. I never wanted to deal with the water intrusion that could cause a lot of future problems when I had mine so I didn't push the envelope. Those tires were only inflated to 2 lbs because it had no suspension at either end, and when you unloaded it from a pickup truck all you had to do was lift the rear of it and drag it backward until the front wheel was about to clear the tailgate and just drop it. It bounced on the soft tires when it landed. It was a lot of fun but the fun wore out pretty quickly because it was underpowered and had such a small scope of practical use.
 
Dang, some very nice bikes you have had the pleasure of owning. I’ve only had 11 bikes since 9 years old. And I still have 6 of them. I sold my YZ250 when I got married (1987) and didn’t have a bike again till I was about 30.
 
Nice bit of history there. You certainly had many now-classic bikes.

I was going through some boxes of very old crap a while back and found the title for my '74 Yamaha RD60, my first bike.
I got it in '77 and totaled it in '79. It went to the scrap yard, I don't why I still have the title.
The junk (memories) you haul around for years..
I didn't buy another bike until '88. Got hit on that one and rebuilt it, but that's another story.
 
Dang, some very nice bikes you have had the pleasure of owning. I’ve only had 11 bikes since 9 years old. And I still have 6 of them. I sold my YZ250 when I got married (1987) and didn’t have a bike again till I was about 30.

Thanks, but the sad part to me is my inability to hold onto some of them over the years, but for most of my life I've had to sell one to be able to move on to the next bike. I was in the best shape of my motorcycle life after closing my shop at age 21, I had the custom paint CB750, my first 450 drag bike and the Hodaka 125 at the same time despite being on the verge of the worst year financially in my life (1975) when I was out of work for a total of 6 months. The 750 was the only thing that survived that period since it was my only transportation, the other two were sold with the drag bike (no title) being the biggest loss selling for a measly $125 (one month's rent in my 1 bedroom apartment then). I know the feeling of being out of bikes longer than you would like, I went 19 years without one after selling my second CBX in early '94 when my daughter was going on 2 years old and the money went into a screened porch on the house I moved out of during my divorce 2 years later. Child support ended in 2010 but it took me another 3 years to get solvent enough to finally buy another bike, the VF1100S.
 
Nice bit of history there. You certainly had many now-classic bikes.

I was going through some boxes of very old crap a while back and found the title for my '74 Yamaha RD60, my first bike.
I got it in '77 and totaled it in '79. It went to the scrap yard, I don't why I still have the title.
The junk (memories) you haul around for years..
I didn't buy another bike until '88. Got hit on that one and rebuilt it, but that's another story.

Thanks! It has been a fun ride for sure with a lot of great memories. My father once flipped a Yamaha JT60 Mini-Enduro and the cops came to him years later telling him they found his bike in an old mining pit, asked if he wanted it back. He had sold it with title but the new owner never registered it. What did you buy after 9 years away from riding?
 
my first bike was a JT1 (or 2) at 9 years old.

I'm quite sure that bike taught you a lot about riding. I wasn't fortunate to start on a real dirt bike for the day, but to teach me how to ride in all conditions my father would only let me ride that CA102 in the defunct orange grove next to our house in Lutz until he felt like I was pretty good at it. Yeah, not a dirt bike at all and it handled like it :rolleyes:
 
I'm quite sure that bike taught you a lot about riding. I wasn't fortunate to start on a real dirt bike for the day, but to teach me how to ride in all conditions my father would only let me ride that CA102 in the defunct orange grove next to our house in Lutz until he felt like I was pretty good at it. Yeah, not a dirt bike at all and it handled like it :rolleyes:

yes it was a great first bike. The 78 YZ250 I had taught me a lot about crashing. That thing was a handful.
 
yes it was a great first bike. The 78 YZ250 I had taught me a lot about crashing. That thing was a handful.

Starting with the DT-1 and RT-1, I learned to hate 2 strokes because of the light-switch power delivery - on or off for the most part. That's why I stuck with the heavier 4 stroke behemoths during my early bike days once I was buying and selling them on my own, and was thrilled when Honda came out with the XL250.
 
Starting with the DT-1 and RT-1, I learned to hate 2 strokes because of the light-switch power delivery - on or off for the most part. That's why I stuck with the heavier 4 stroke behemoths during my early bike days once I was buying and selling them on my own, and was thrilled when Honda came out with the XL250.

I had a 72 SL125 after the 60. It was a bit light on power. I would have loved a 250 at the time. I have a 75 now.
 
Wow Tom, it's hard to believe you went 19 years without after so many. My '70 Minitrail went bye-bye in '73 due to a forced family relocation. I only went 10 years before Turin Bicycles of Denver's owner and the manager forced me to get the last remaining Puch moped out of the boss's garage for $50, including all the tools, spare parts and shop manuals. I only had it to ride till 2010 when my wife bought me the '80 GS750L for my birthday. Still have the bike and the wife.
During the late '80's I had traded bicycle work for a couple projects that mostly sat and sat, a '74 Harley/Aerrmachi 175SS and the '62 brown CA95 Benly, the 2 stroke Harley still sits.
Current census is 20 bikes, I think, though Charles owns 4 of them. About half of them run. I just can't let any go, yet.
 
Hey, you have quite the group of good projects to keep you busy and give you a diversity of rides like few people have. I wish I could add a couple more to my collection but it just isn't in the affordability cards unless, as my father used to say, my ship comes in.

Wow Tom, it's hard to believe you went 19 years without after so many.

It was a forced abandonment of what I love at the time. Two years before my divorce when the 2nd CBX was sold she said at the time "we can always get you another one" and as those words faded into the tense silence, I knew that would never happen. Two years later I had a regular monthly bill of more than most luxury car payments of the day and though I did walk away with my '84 Monte Carlo SS, fully tricked out with great stereo and all the gadgets an accessories installer would want (but in trade for my share of the equity in our house when later sold), that car got stolen from my work parking lot on the day after Thanksgiving 1996 only months after we split up. Only 2 years prior I had a nice house, a new daughter, a cool Monte Carlo SS with only 80,000 miles on it and an '80 CBX... but by December of '96 all I had left was visitation with my daughter every other weekend, an $800 '87 Mazda 323 beater to get to work with and an 850 sq ft rental 2 bedroom townhouse while breaking even every payday for the foreseeable future. It wasn't until I met my wonderful wife in 2001 that things started improving but it still took until 2010 and the end of child support (during which I also went self-employed and that took a year or so to become solvent) for me to even think about owning another bike. I did buy that '77 CB750F as a project (oddly enough from my later-to-become camping buddy, the late Don Sills who I went to Barber with twice) in 2006 but I ended up selling it when I went self-employed in 2007 because I knew I couldn't afford to put any of my saved money into it until business picked up. And THAT was a crazy story, the bike was bought by a guy who drove tour buses out of Orlando and he came to pick the bike up with the tour bus... we ended up stuffing the bike, on its side, into the luggage hold under the middle of the bus. Ah, the memories... :rolleyes:
 
Tom, that's quite the run down, even the downs. My own lean years (decades) were similarly tough at the time. If I was told of my situation now, I would have laughed in disbelief. I know we can't walk in another man's moccasins and I couldn't walk in my own very well without tripping, for so many years.
All I really wanted was a 350 but now have 4 that don't run yet.
I know this is related to the question of 'what is the meaning of life', which I have a pretty good handle on, but is evidence of further redemption required, mechanical and spiritual.
Lessons are costly but learning is free, funny how that is. :neutral:
 
I think most of our life journey stories would be similar with just some differences in the details. When I got my first street bike when I was 30 (81 Yamaha XJ650 maxim) I had to trade an office desk that I built for it because I couldn’t afford to buy it straight out. $800 trade value.
 
Thanks! It has been a fun ride for sure with a lot of great memories. My father once flipped a Yamaha JT60 Mini-Enduro and the cops came to him years later telling him they found his bike in an old mining pit, asked if he wanted it back. He had sold it with title but the new owner never registered it. What did you buy after 9 years away from riding?

Ok, so here's the other story. I bought an '81 XL185s. The guy I bought it from got it from a police auction. It was missing a lot stuff, no blinkers, non-stock seat, rear fender, taillight, etc. and had been abused. (The chain broke the day I bought it.) But it was cheap.
A couple of months after I got it the engine seized while I was out on the highway. That was scary.
I rebuilt the top end and in '89 I got rear ended while waiting to make a left turn. A kid in a Mustang tried to drive through me. Lucky it had a low front end. If it had been a truck or a bigger car I'd probably be dead or in a wheel chair.

Strangely enough a couple of weeks later while I was at the doctors (broken coccyx from the accident) I looked out the back window of the office and spotted an '82 XL185s with no engine behind a shed across the alley. So after leaving the doctors I went over and knocked the door of the house. The 185 engine was in pieces in a box on the front porch. I was going to offer the owner $100 for the whole thing but when I asked what he'd take he said $75. Score!
The '82 was great shape, totally complete minus the blown engine.
So I dropped my '81 engine in the frame and I had a new bike, better than before.
Rode it for a couple of more years then I moved and quit riding it. (I lived in town, no dirt.)
Decided to sell it in '96 or '97. Regretted it ever since.
I liked that XL185 a lot better than the '79 XL250s I have now.
 
Ok, so here's the other story. I bought an '81 XL185s. The guy I bought it from got it from a police auction. It was missing a lot stuff, no blinkers, non-stock seat, rear fender, taillight, etc. and had been abused. (The chain broke the day I bought it.) But it was cheap.
A couple of months after I got it the engine seized while I was out on the highway. That was scary.
I rebuilt the top end and in '89 I got rear ended while waiting to make a left turn. A kid in a Mustang tried to drive through me. Lucky it had a low front end. If it had been a truck or a bigger car I'd probably be dead or in a wheel chair.

Strangely enough a couple of weeks later while I was at the doctors (broken coccyx from the accident) I looked out the back window of the office and spotted an '82 XL185s with no engine behind a shed across the alley. So after leaving the doctors I went over and knocked the door of the house. The 185 engine was in pieces in a box on the front porch. I was going to offer the owner $100 for the whole thing but when I asked what he'd take he said $75. Score!
The '82 was great shape, totally complete minus the blown engine.
So I dropped my '81 engine in the frame and I had a new bike, better than before.
Rode it for a couple of more years then I moved and quit riding it. (I lived in town, no dirt.)
Decided to sell it in '96 or '97. Regretted it ever since.
I liked that XL185 a lot better than the '79 XL250s I have now.

Good for you surviving a rear end accident, I've always dreaded that possibility. Quite the combination of events, although it was a hard way to eventually find what you needed. Worked out well for you in the end, except for the regret of selling it that I know all too well myself. I never rode an XL185, only knew one person who owned one back then and I never had the opportunity to ride it. I loved my XL250 but the 185 might have been better size for size because it was lighter.
 
Good for you surviving a rear end accident, I've always dreaded that possibility. Quite the combination of events, although it was a hard way to eventually find what you needed. Worked out well for you in the end, except for the regret of selling it that I know all too well myself. I never rode an XL185, only knew one person who owned one back then and I never had the opportunity to ride it. I loved my XL250 but the 185 might have been better size for size because it was lighter.

The '79 XL250s has a seat like a 2x4. It's uncomfortable. I'm tall so I sit back a bit.
For whatever reason the XL185 was a lot more comfortable.
Yeah, the kid (he was 22) who hit me was doing about 30 and didn't brake until I was on his hood.
(There was a constable in an unmarked car right behind him who witnessed the whole thing.)
He was driving on a suspended license with no insurance and had (literally) a four page driving record.
I had to sue his parents (owners of the Mustang) and got a judgement.
They declared bankruptcy and I ended up getting much less many years later.
Somewhere I have photos of the bike and the 20 foot skid marks from the Mustang.
 
The '79 XL250s has a seat like a 2x4. It's uncomfortable. I'm tall so I sit back a bit.
For whatever reason the XL185 was a lot more comfortable.
Yeah, the kid (he was 22) who hit me was doing about 30 and didn't brake until I was on his hood.
(There was a constable in an unmarked car right behind him who witnessed the whole thing.)
He was driving on a suspended license with no insurance and had (literally) a four page driving record.
I had to sue his parents (owners of the Mustang) and got a judgement.
They declared bankruptcy and I ended up getting much less many years later.
Somewhere I have photos of the bike and the 20 foot skid marks from the Mustang.

Wow, so the story didn't end as well as it should have. Hopefully you didn't suffer any permanent injuries, though I'm sure any of what happened to you then has (or eventually will) come back to haunt you a bit at some point if it hasn't already.
 
Great list of bikes Tom and some how you have all those pictures from back in the day. I never owned or had a camera, or even a cheap Polaroid instant camera from back in the day. My younger sister has a bunch of early family photos inherited from Mom dating from the 60's and 70's that I need to check out someday, to see what may be in there.

I think you have owned, or still own some real classic Honda bikes in your journey. Nice that you have those pictures to "remember when" even those with your Mom there in a few. Great thread with some wonderful and also tragic stuff too. That one with Cycleranger with the bankruptcy parents to avoid paying for the son is a real ugly part of life unfortunately.
 
Great list of bikes Tom and some how you have all those pictures from back in the day. I never owned or had a camera, or even a cheap Polaroid instant camera from back in the day. My younger sister has a bunch of early family photos inherited from Mom dating from the 60's and 70's that I need to check out someday, to see what may be in there.

I think you have owned, or still own some real classic Honda bikes in your journey. Nice that you have those pictures to "remember when" even those with your Mom there in a few. Great thread with some wonderful and also tragic stuff too. That one with Cycleranger with the bankruptcy parents to avoid paying for the son is a real ugly part of life unfortunately.

Thanks, I was fortunate to have a great situation growing up. The only bikes I currently have are the red 450, the CB900F, the drag bike project and the CB350K1 which may well get sold to recoup some money after the engine rebuild. If I found the right deal on something else I might be inclined to add one more but for now, the others are just what you described, great memories. I was fortunate that my parents did take some pictures along the way though not as many as I would have liked to as a kid, of course. My father is in few of them because he was always the photographer. If my Mom had not been a rider herself and weekend camping/dirt riding participant I wouldn't have the many pictures of her on and around bikes, but she was involved in a lot of the stuff my father did while I was growing up - sometimes helping with his totaled car rebuilds too, they were always trying to make extra money. Their photo album is where many of those pictures came from, scanned pages of pictures glued into the album and then resized and cropped.

I was also fortunate to have never experienced the bad side of riding street bikes like Cycleranger did, I was only involved in 2 accidents and one was very minor despite being the car driver's fault. The other was my fault (misjudged a VW Squareback making a turn) but I was the only person who suffered minor injury and damage to my bike. I can't imagine having to chase someone to get a settlement for an accident they were at fault for and then having that happen as did in his case, though I do personally know a couple who did something similar for their delinquent son and the lack of taking responsibility for their actions is disgusting.
 
This picture has me wondering what is stuffed in those front spokes?

It's a common question but it wasn't anything exotic, just duct tape to make the physical presence of the rim and tire height from the ground a bit taller to help break the light beam at the far end of the track. Without it, sometimes spoked wheel bikes wouldn't break the beam and therefore got not time and speed from the run.
 
Ok, that makes sense. I guess I would have known that if I flew down a track a time or two, unfortunately, I havent. No race tracks near me. I was just a bit too young to enjoy the old famous https://doverdragstrip.com/ before it closed down... that was less than a mile from where I live now..
Anyway, those are some cool bikes you had through the years...so, out of all those bikes which one do you wish you never sold and still had today?
 
Ok, that makes sense. I guess I would have known that if I flew down a track a time or two, unfortunately, I havent. No race tracks near me. I was just a bit too young to enjoy the old famous https://doverdragstrip.com/ before it closed down... that was less than a mile from where I live now..
Anyway, those are some cool bikes you had through the years...so, out of all those bikes which one do you wish you never sold and still had today?

Interesting history of Dover Drag Strip, and that it was NHRA sanctioned for only one year for safety reasons. My local track had the same problem and I think it was only IHRA sanctioned for a few years, never NHRA. It had too short a slowdown length and cars that ran quicker than 9 seconds would shut off early, and later they just quit going there. While Don Garlits was still running in the 8 second range at about 160 mph he would test there because his shop was first in Tampa, then later Seffner east of Tampa, but he quit going there well before I showed up the first time while in high school with my CL450K4 so I never got to see him run there. When Bradenton Motorsports Park was built (originally called DeSoto Memorial Dragway, east of Bradenton FL) in the early '70s and Twin City Dragway (my local track in Oldsmar FL) was in its decline and would be closed soon, I took my 450 to Bradenton to run at an NHRA sanctioned 1/4 mile. I pulled up to the gate and was promptly told I couldn't run there. I was not happy after driving over 60 miles only to find out they didn't allow motorcycles, if you can imagine. I told them I had already run hundreds, if not over 1000, times at Twin City but they weren't having it, said bikes were too dangerous. So that left me with Sunshine Drag Strip (still in existence) in Pinellas Park FL but over 35 miles from me then, now about 70 miles away and still running 1/8 mile since the late '70s for the same reason, short slowdown area. At least at Twin City if you ran off the end of the track (I never came close at the speeds I ran) it was just into the woods. At Sunshine, now called Showtime, the track ended at a major highway (Ulmerton Rd) so you'd go through the fence and out into traffic. My one drag strip video is from Showtime in early 2019, had serious traction problems with the Dunlop K70 period-correct rear tire choice and got smoked by the guy I went to the track with, local riding buddy Ray with his 2006 Ninja 650.

If I could only have one bike back from all I've owned, it would be the '80 CBX. If I could have a few more back again I'd add the first Gold Wing (yellow whale), probably the custom paint CB750K3 and the SL350K1. And my father's only drag bike build, a 200cc modified CB175 running a MegaCycle flat track cam and 26mm Mikunis that we launched at 9,000 to 10,000 rpm and shifted at 11,500. It ran consistent low 15 second 1/4 mile times at around 80 mph, one 40° night it ran a 14.98.
 
Interesting story AD, sounds like you have quite a few track miles under your belt... That 1980 CBX was probably one hell of a ride! They dont make them like they used to...theres actually one for sale on FB market somewhere in MD asking price of $20K!! its nice, black with orange stripes.. btw what is the factory GP kit?
 
Interesting story AD, sounds like you have quite a few track miles under your belt... That 1980 CBX was probably one hell of a ride! They dont make them like they used to...theres actually one for sale on FB market somewhere in MD asking price of $20K!! its nice, black with orange stripes.. btw what is the factory GP kit?

The GP kit came with lower bars, brake hose, cables and revised throttle assembly (to clear the big gas tank) and rearset brackets for the pegs. I didn't use the rearset peg brackets because I carried a passenger now and then, but the bars really transformed the bike.

w3ljeaT.jpg
 
Good lord, what an entertaining journey and historical stable. Fun reading how people got started. I learned on an XL70 when I was nine in the 70's, then an XR80 and XL 175, all owned by friends. As a young adult got some road time on my brother's and friends' bikes--RZ350, GPZ550, Interceptor 500 and a couple others. 30 years later after many other obsessions, I bought my GS750 two years ago and the bug bit me hard, now have three in the garage, with an XS11 rebuild/refresh almost done and the CB acquired most recently a few months ago. Thanks for sharing.
 
Good lord, what an entertaining journey and historical stable. Fun reading how people got started. I learned on an XL70 when I was nine in the 70's, then an XR80 and XL 175, all owned by friends. As a young adult got some road time on my brother's and friends' bikes--RZ350, GPZ550, Interceptor 500 and a couple others. 30 years later after many other obsessions, I bought my GS750 two years ago and the bug bit me hard, now have three in the garage, with an XS11 rebuild/refresh almost done and the CB acquired most recently a few months ago. Thanks for sharing.

Thanks, I was fortunate to have the parents I had as well as the access to good deals while I spent time at Honda shops learning to work on the bikes as well. As I reflect on it all, I'm always glad I got started the way I did, starting small and working my way up in bike size and performance as I learned to ride each one well. In large part, I have my father to thank for that. And I was lucky to get started during the perfect era of Honda development IMO. When I read how others got started, often on larger and more high performance bikes like some of the experiences you mentioned, I'm always thinking they either learned really fast or were lucky in some ways, or a combination of both - so often young people start on too large a displacement bike only to get too confident too quickly which sometimes results in a serious crash. Glad it didn't happen to you and you're finally getting to enjoy the sport of collecting and riding them.
 
When I read how others got started, often on larger and more high performance bikes like some of the experiences you mentioned, I'm always thinking they either learned really fast or were lucky in some ways, or a combination of both - so often young people start on too large a displacement bike

Ha, I hear you, but I know you don't mean the 70-80cc dirt bikes! And there were other more mellow street bikes in the mix early in adulthood, those few I mentioned were just the more memorable ones (not too large displacement either, it must be said, though sport bikes--the RZ was so fun to ride). And nevertheless, what daredevil there is in me (ex-vert skater, bmxer, mountain biker, blah blah blah) is balanced by a healthy respect for learning skill before daring too far... And now that I'm older I'm a downright chicken! I love the learning curve above mindless speed... And I never try to keep up with anyone whose skills exceed mine. Who am I kidding anyway, I'm wrenching them most of the time at this point... I will say I would like to do a track school and explore that a bit sometime, after more miles and when funds permit. I'm not too far from Loudon and had a gas watching the vintage race there last year.

Anyway it's been fun to learn the mechanical ins and outs of these three different bikes from forums like this one--grateful for the generosity and experience of everyone here. Cheers!
 
Anyway it's been fun to learn the mechanical ins and outs of these three different bikes from forums like this one--grateful for the generosity and experience of everyone here.

We enjoy doing what we do, which makes it a lot easier to put in the time and effort. We're glad you're here and we appreciate all of our active members. And it's good to know that you had the other riding/skating experience to help temper your approach to motorcycle riding, it makes a big difference.
 
I did own a 1971 Honda 175cc back in 93. and my son now owns a 1970 Twinstar CM200T that he will be turning into a cafe bike.
 
Hey Ancientdad

What a fantastic history of the bikes you have own /brought or borrowed over your youthful years till now in your Exciting Maturing years
Some fantastic bikes and pictures of a strapping lad
You have had a dream list for some of the most loved Honda's over the years

I have owned more bike than cars over the years but no where close to you list
 
Hey Ancientdad

What a fantastic history of the bikes you have own /brought or borrowed over your youthful years till now in your Exciting Maturing years
Some fantastic bikes and pictures of a strapping lad
You have had a dream list for some of the most loved Honda's over the years

I have owned more bike than cars over the years but no where close to you list

Thanks Chris, I was a very fortunate kid to grow up with a motorcycle-involved father who also had the skills he had, it allowed me to own many bikes that I could never have afforded to buy new or even good used then. And it was a great progression from small to large, which allowed me to learn to handle the horsepower in the safest way along with getting experience riding both on and off road. I went into high school 5'10" and only 125 lbs, and hard dirt riding helped me grow about 2" and gain about 40 lbs of lean weight by age 19. The XL250 was the best dual sport bike I ever owned, and the CBX and '75 Gold Wing (along with the best CB750K3 with the custom paint) were the best street bikes.
 
Yeah, I didn't mention the truck as I figured all could see the ATC90 in the back of it, but the '72 Chevy LUV was my first 4 wheeled vehicle right out of high school, $2580 out the door with the step bumper, aluminum wheels and wide tires on it (70 series front, 60 series rear). Oh, and an AM radio and I later added an 8 track player. :D My Dad co-signed on it, the one and only time he did, and when my cousin and I opened our modest Honda repair shop in January of '73 (me at age 18, he at 21) in the very building that picture is in front of, a 4 room bungalow on State Road 60 in Brandon FL (the only commercial property available at the time on the main road), the truck was taken over by the shop which allowed me to later buy the first CB750 new. Trading payments from the truck (about $60 a month for 3 years) to the 750 ($63 a month for 3 years, higher interest because I was young, only the truck as previous credit) was at least affordable... well, barely as we started our paychecks at $50 a week, $43.47 take home. :eek: The one remaining sticker of the 1000 we had made to stick everywhere, and of course on all of our customer's bikes we worked on. I thought they were all gone forever until I opened a small 2 drawer toolbox I've had since a teenager and saw this stuck inside the lid (along with an early triangular 450 sidecover emblem/sticker)

View attachment 266
Ahhhhh, 689-7980 baby! Brings back memories! I remember all these bikes... lol, wish I had pics of all mine. I got 19K miles on my VTX now!
 
Ahhhhh, 689-7980 baby! Brings back memories! I remember all these bikes... lol, wish I had pics of all mine. I got 19K miles on my VTX now!
I know, I wish I had pictures of all mine too, or at least better pictures of the ones I do have in some cases. Talk about fun memories, how about Z50 races around and through the shop? :ROFLMAO: That would be funny video now...
 
I know, I wish I had pictures of all mine too, or at least better pictures of the ones I do have in some cases. Talk about fun memories, how about Z50 races around and through the shop? :ROFLMAO: That would be funny video now...
LOL, the Z50 races were epic!! Or the burn out attempt on the front sidewalk? Hahahaha, classic!
 
Or the burn out attempt on the front sidewalk? Hahahaha, classic!
You had to go there didn't you? :ROFLMAO: Sure glad there weren't cell phones back then, at least now I have (somewhat) plausible deniability now!

Truth is, we didn't take enough pictures then... despite how things ended up, we'd have still had a lot of fun stuff to look at now.
 
You had to go there didn't you? :ROFLMAO: Sure glad there weren't cell phones back then, at least now I have (somewhat) plausible deniability now!

Truth is, we didn't take enough pictures then... despite how things ended up, we'd have still had a lot of fun stuff to look at now.
LOL, of course! You shouldn't look at it negatively, it was a learning experience!! And a tire test... it hooked up! :LOL::LOL:
 
Back
Top Bottom