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CA95 Barn Find

This just keeps getting better. I'd like mine with the rotisserie function too please. That gasket kit with the seals BB noted seems like a deal for sure if you're so inclined. Like how you had time to paint that motor stand and rubberize the base. LOL.
 
Started pulling the engine apart. Struggled with pulling the servo until I read a trick about using the rear axle of the bike as my threading tool. A snug socket with pressure on the axle zipped the servo right off.

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I'll jam a soft copper penny in the primary gears, on the other side to immobilize the crank for further dismantling.
 
This just keeps getting better. I'd like mine with the rotisserie function too please. That gasket kit with the seals BB noted seems like a deal for sure if you're so inclined. Like how you had time to paint that motor stand and rubberize the base. LOL.
Well painting was the easy part; the journeyman diesel mechanic I employ did the hard stuff ;)
 
So disassembling this and there is no tachometer gearbox and no cam shaft gear; is something up here?

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Pretty sure it's just because the CA95 was never sold with a tach. Honda wasn't much on putting some of the pieces in place for owners to use to 'upgrade' their bikes that long ago, they typically put shift points on the speedo face in place of having a tachometer.
 
All the CA95 's came with tach drive up till the 'later' 64-66 versions. None ever came with tachs though. The original CB92 had the tach drive and when configured for racing, the speedo would be replaced with a tach.
 
All the CA95 's came with tach drive up till the 'later' 64-66 versions. None ever came with tachs though. The original CB92 had the tach drive and when configured for racing, the speedo would be replaced with a tach.
Wasn't aware of that and honestly, surprised yet not considering the small twin racing stuff they offered back then.
 
Wasn't aware of that and honestly, surprised yet not considering the small twin racing stuff they offered back then.
In '59 Honda kicked butt at the Ilse of Mann in 125cc and began offering entry level racing kit for the CB92 including high comp pistons, starter delete, sprockets, megaphones, lower handlebars, rear sets, race seat and F&R shock upgrades. It's in the FSM that covers 59-66.

They never made a CB95 but that would have been cool. They launched the CB160 in '65 instead
 
In '59 Honda kicked butt at the Ilse of Mann in 125cc and began offering entry level racing kit for the CB92 including high comp pistons, starter delete, sprockets, megaphones, lower handlebars, rear sets, race seat and F&R shock upgrades. It's in the FSM that covers 59-66.

They never made a CB95 but that would have been cool. They launched the CB160 in '65 instead
And there is the reason I never knew. I've never worked on them or looked at a FSM for those older models. I do know about their IOM success, read plenty of magazine articles about it all back in the late '60s and early '70s. You, sir, are a student of these smaller twins for sure.
 
All the CA95 's came with tach drive up till the 'later' 64-66 versions. None ever came with tachs though. The original CB92 had the tach drive and when configured for racing, the speedo would be replaced with a tach.
I missed the "IF YOUR CA95" at the start of the sentence in the service manual. Thank you!
 
Did some more tearing apart today. Nothing particular stood out to me that screamed "loss of compression". The lobes on the cam were perfect, springs we're fine, valves seated nicely.

Two things with the cylinders and pistons. The cylinders were like glass, no cross hatching, and on the cylinder with the least compression I had two rings oriented the same direction (I'm not sure if they're supposed to be, in my past experience they usually aren't). So it might be those things, shrug.

Cleaned up the grubby alternator, going to take it in Monday and have it rebuilt and have the stator checked. I also cleaned up the cylinder sleeve. Back and forth from the ultrasonic to wire brushing three times then reoiling with mystery oil. I know I can get it better, going to gently walnut blast it this week.

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Any idea what mileage is? Anything over 20K, I wouldn't be surprised the rings worn out, even less, if ever run low or not changed much. Check piston crowns for size, no mark=standard, or0.25 or 0.50 =oversized. I'd check piston to bore clearance or have it checked. Skirt wear doesn't look too bad but it's rare, IMO, that you could just hone and re-ring. Still should remove wrist pins and check small rod wear. Sometimes new wrist pins can help.
If it were mine, knowing these old ones, I'd flip and remove lower case for a thorough clean out, including the hidden crank sludge traps and big end rod rollers as well as the main bearings.
Head on it's side, fill ex then int ports with gas to check seat leakage. Proceed with de-carbonization and lapping seats (if faces aren't too cupped or pitted) for re-assembly.
 
Yeah boy! I do like those old gasket kits, the gaskets themselves are accurate and beefy. Some that came with the rubber bits have degraded rubber (like that square cam chain tunnel ring) so be cautious using them.
Came with these too and they're in good shape.
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My advice. Don't bother with the pipe cleaner floppy ex header gaskets. I bought some nice copper crush washers from Wicks Aircraft and Motorsports, item AN900-19, for cheaper than any Honda types.
I also use generic silicone O-rings from amazon for the header to muffler connection.

I think these are them, better measure, might be for Dreams. Same deal there.
Thank you for this, I have lots of both washers and silicone rings, I'll have to go double check.
 
Thank you for this, I have lots of both washers and silicone rings, I'll have to go double check.
My advice. Don't bother with the pipe cleaner floppy ex header gaskets. I bought some nice copper crush washers from Wicks Aircraft and Motorsports, item AN900-19, for cheaper than any Honda types.
I also use generic silicone O-rings from amazon for the header to muffler connection.

I think these are them, better measure, might be for Dreams. Same deal there.
Don't mean to butt in, just a dumb question, why is it necessary to use any o ring between the muffler to header pipe and how do you get it between the two, there is virtually no gap.
 
Don't mean to butt in, just a dumb question, why is it necessary to use any o ring between the muffler to header pipe and how do you get it between the two, there is virtually no gap.
The OEM mufflers had a kind of circular pocket, if you will, that used a pink rubber (silicone?) O-ring/grommet that is NLA from Honda. Aftermarket mufflers may be just slip fit, IDK.
I still reserve the right to ask the most dumb questions. :ROFLMAO:
 
I'm excited; I found my compression issue. Do you think it was left off during installation? No sign of metal in the oil.

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Well, that explains one cylinder's weak compression, but not the other. There's no way that ring got out of the groove or broke up in pieces that got out of the groove, I've seen broken rings still in the grooves when I've pulled cylinders before. Had to have been left off during assembly. Now you'd suspect a leaking valve in the other cylinder since all 3 rings are there and intact.
 
Found another issue, although I don't think it'll affect compression. One of the seats was missing from the brass valve stem guide on an exhaust valve so the spring was seated directly on the head. I'm sure it's enough to throw the valve seating tolerance off.

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Hmm.. Who knows why both these missing parts happened. At least it doesn't look like the head is damaged. I'd want to check the spring lengths next.
You certainly validated your tear down efforts. Another PO hall of shame example.
 
Whoever put that engine together broke a ring when they were putting it on and didn't bother to replace it.
Probably was planning to sell the bike and just needed it to run.
 
The OEM mufflers had a kind of circular pocket, if you will, that used a pink rubber (silicone?) O-ring/grommet that is NLA from Honda. Aftermarket mufflers may be just slip fit, IDK.
I still reserve the right to ask the most dumb questions. :ROFLMAO:
Yes, I should have looked at my OEM exhaust and answered my own question, I was thinking of aftermarket, which are a slip fit.
 
My pistons and cylinders measured at exactly the repair threshold. Went ahead and ordered all the goodies to bore up .25; piston #2 that did have a middle ring had the incorrect ring - it didn't have the angular edge, it was just another top ring.

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Found another issue: while cleaning the head one of the rocker arm collars casually fell out of the head. It's obvious by the wear that the collar had been spinning in place which means the rocker arm must have also been turning too.

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I got my starter and stator back. He didn't have to order anything for the starter, he said it was completely packed with crud and the brushes were rusted like it might have held water at one time, but, good as new!

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Now that I have a handle on the top end, it's time to tear into the bottom end. Wish me luck! Bonus port polish picture.

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Great job you're doing. Nice sleuthing the ring-o-rama, if only for curiosity's sake. I thought it may be a possibility given the disregard for missing pieces.
The bushing fit may work with some Locktite bearing mount and an internal knurl could maybe be done by tapping in and eze-out spiral extractor to somewhat restore the interference fit, Others here with way more experience than moi could have a better suggestion.

How are you going to do the valve seats? Like the rest of your bike, I've seen so much worse.
 
piston #2 that did have a middle ring had the incorrect ring - it didn't have the angular edge, it was just another top ring.
Well that speaks to the (lack of) quality of that 'rebuild' prior. And they probably put an old used ring in it as well, likely from the previous build so the added wear contributed to the low compression
 
Would anyone happen to know the specifics of the long head stud bolts A? Previous builder thread locked them and they got pretty gnarled up. Not finding a set of six anywhere.
 
Started opening up the bottom end and ran into my first issue. I was measuring the thickness of my clutch and friction discs. All was well, nearly perfect, until I noticed a spec for a clutch disc B. It appears there are supposed to be three clutch disc A's and one B (twice the thickness of A). Mine has 4 A discs. I don't think there's supposed to be that gap on the clutch center?

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My parts book shows only one "A" in the front right position and it is the one skinny one. Your earlier pic shows the skinny in the right rear. It is possible that it is a mix up in the PB. the two middle ones (#26) are 8x249. I can go look at my open case but yours seems right due to the oil hole at the bottom.
If the top threads are ok and they are not loose then use as is.
 
Started opening up the bottom end and ran into my first issue. I was measuring the thickness of my clutch and friction discs. All was well, nearly perfect, until I noticed a spec for a clutch disc B. It appears there are supposed to be three clutch disc A's and one B (twice the thickness of A). Mine has 4 A discs. I don't think there's supposed to be that gap on the clutch center?
Here is a thread on my clutch upgrade that you may want to consider the options that I went through.
 
Here is a thread on my clutch upgrade that you may want to consider the options that I went through.
This is perfect, do I just need one, or two of the steel offset plates?
 
This is perfect, do I just need one, or two of the steel offset plates?
If doing the offset option, only one offset required but the friction disc that will sit next to it must have additional clearance. See pic in post #3 in that thread. Are you going to get the Newfren friction disc set? That will have the friction disc with extra inner diameter to fit the offset plate.
 
The beauty of this older style clutch system is you can set it all up and observe the action with the clutch cover off.
 
If doing the offset option, only one offset required but the friction disc that will sit next to it must have additional clearance. See pic in post #3 in that thread. Are you going to get the Newfren friction disc set? That will have the friction disc with extra inner diameter to fit the offset plate.
Yes, I just ordered the Newfren set. Thank you for awesome fix!
 
I see why your studs came out. I buy those little brushes by the bag and there are 3" stem ones too. Even use in my drill.
 
We're completely torn down! To my novice eyes, there's nothing out of the ordinary (secretly damaged teeth or seals). I'll have a more seasoned set of eyes review the wear for me.

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Tomorrow I'm going to drop the cylinder sleeve off for boring and the head to get the valve seats cleaned up. Everyone loves part pictures!

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In constant-mesh transmissions like our Hondas, wear on the teeth is rarely the issue because shifting the transmission while riding does not disengage and engage teeth, the shift forks move a gear sideways and the engagement dogs on the sides of the gears are what engage and disengage during each shift. So you want to closely examine the dogs and their corresponding engagement areas on the sides of the gears for rounded edges, wear and chipped spots (the latter being rare).
 
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