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1979 CM400A Winter Rebuild [COMPLETE]

It's all good. Lot of stuff flowing in these threads, especially when they're long and you miss those small details. I do the same thing.

Not a lot of news, but there is some. My contact in France was able to order which is apparently the only remaining oil cooler gasket on planet earth. I have one already sourced from that bottom end kit, but this one was cheap so I'd like to keep it as a backup in my parts hoard. Will keep you posted when it arrives. Will probably be about 3-4 weeks.

I already have a spare, but got yet ANOTHER spare of the very rare "change switch" or rather "neutral switch". Found someone who mislisted it on eBay not knowing what it was, and at a great price. It has arrived, and this one actually has the rubber boot cover. That boot is always missing on every single one I've found and every single Hondamatic I've worked on. I think they just crack and disintegrate and that's that.

I also cleaned out DSS on their last remaining set of 400A carb insulators. So I now have three sets NOS, one in use. Enough to ideally last me a lifetime, if stored properly, which they will be.

I have packages to ship out this week so I will be sending the cylinder with pistons this week. I'll throw that crank in for inspection.
 
A heartbeat to this thread. Need to find time to run out to Lowe's or similar to get some of that cardboard tube stuff to place in the cylinder stud holes and get everything packaged and ship for the machinist. Been quite busy recently. Planning to find time this week or this weekend.

Because of the fragility and rarity of the piston rings themselves that and the pistons will be in a separate package. Insured for their full value.
 
A heartbeat to this thread. Need to find time to run out to Lowe's or similar to get some of that cardboard tube stuff to place in the cylinder stud holes and get everything packaged and ship for the machinist. Been quite busy recently. Planning to find time this week or this weekend.

Because of the fragility and rarity of the piston rings themselves that and the pistons will be in a separate package. Insured for their full value.

Bet I know where they're going.
 
In my quest to acquire enough valve cover gaskets, valve cover bolt grommets, oil filters, carb insulators, spark plugs and caps to last me literally in my lifetime (no joke) I threw in a new clutch lever rubber. To the curious, it is the same however it's about 1mm wider on each end. You wouldn't notice unless you took both to compare. But, if this matters to you then be warned it won't win Concours because of this. 😂
 
Also for the curious... I received a spare "Gasket Kit A" because the price was cheap and includes the valve cover gasket. This appears (to me) to be early-to-mid-80s stock because it has the more modern Honda logo going across the cover, but also has the 70s style "wing" logo at the top left.

What amazed me, and encouraged me to open it, the head gasket looked all black. I could not see the "fire ring" and thought this was strange. Upon closer inspection it has the sealant over it to promote a better seal. This coincides with what Mike has said in one of his articles. He said that later in production Honda started adding a sealer to the head gaskets.

I have never seen this before. Any time I've seen individual head gaskets for sale they have no coating on them. Even the later stock that I suspect is from circa 2000 era.

Just something I found interesting and it was neat to see it firsthand.
 
Have not shipped stuff to machinist yet, been too busy. I have to hit up lowe's or similar to get some of those cardboard tubes to put in the bolt holes.

In the mean time, some things have happened! The "push" cable has been broken for over 10 years. I pulled the inner cable out a long time ago, but kept the outer for looks. I found a used one in good shape for a cheap price. Before installing I cleaned and lubed it, then put it in. Set the slack to where I think it needs to be, started it up and rotated side-to-side, went for a ride and perfect. So I can finally cross that one off the list.

Another thing I have been doing sporadically is spraying some penetrating fluid on the exhaust studs and nuts. Today I went ahead with a long t-handle and tightened about a 1/4" turn until you hear the "click" and then started loosening. The studs are likely to come out as a whole assembly, expected because they are rusty and those studs are always "fun". For now I'm just going to work one direction until you feel a small amount of binding, spray, then go back and tighten again. Lot of boring work, but rather take my time instead of snapping them and being mad at myself. I already ordered new studs and nuts a long time ago.

And finally, just about every canon-plug terminal has been extracted, nipped off, new terminal crimped in place, and dielectric grease. Only the two white ones deep inside the headlight bucket remain. Been doing that for about 30-45 minutes here and there in the evenings when I'm bored.

Otherwise, bike has been running great. Two more miles and I will have 35,555.5 on the odometer. I'll try to get a picture when it happens, but I'll likely forget 😂
 
All this rambling, means nothing without pictures.

So here's the 400 modern OEM gasket. Probably from 90s-2000s era judging by the label. Almost graphite-like in it's feel and appearance:
440_1.jpg

Here's the one out of the 70s-80s stock Gasket Kit A. Notice how it has a sealant, is almost completely black. It even has a unique feel to it:
440_2.jpg
440_3.jpg
The Gasket Kit itself:
440_4.jpg

Old "push" cable that was just for looks:
C1.jpg
C2.jpg

New cable installed:
C3.jpg
C4.jpg

For fun, I also got a CB550 Gasket Kit from the 70s. It too has sealant, but this time in critical areas:
550_2.jpg
550_1.jpg
5503_3.jpg

I know Mike has mentioned it before in articles, but I have never seen it before in pictures or in person. I'm assuming the sealant was used only in the Gasket Kits from Honda. Unknown if the head gaskets by themselves from the 70s have this sealant. Either way, Mike mentioned that near the end of production with this kind of stuff Honda started applying the sealer on the gaskets. Just thought it would be interesting to document.

And finally, Torque Converter Outer Cover Gasket for my hoard. This one has the bin sheet:
TQG.jpg
 
Note the vastly different dealer numbers in the two bin sheets. I'm amazed to see them over 100,000 in the dealer numbers, the but the dealer the lower bin sheet came from is 907, almost as early as Honda of Tampa where I worked at my 3rd dealership. Theirs was in the 500s or 600s, just can't recall the exact number. By comparison, Honda Village was #2827 and the second dealership I worked for, Barney's Outboard Marine and Honda Sales in Tampa, was #1570. It's on my crate tag from the new CL450K4 I bought while working there in high school.

CL450 crate tag.jpg
 
Note the vastly different dealer numbers in the two bin sheets. I'm amazed to see them over 100,000 in the dealer numbers, the but the dealer the lower bin sheet came from is 907, almost as early as Honda of Tampa where I worked at my 3rd dealership. Theirs was in the 500s or 600s, just can't recall the exact number. By comparison, Honda Village was #2827 and the second dealership I worked for, Barney's Outboard Marine and Honda Sales in Tampa, was #1570. It's on my crate tag from the new CL450K4 I bought while working there in high school.

View attachment 25006
One says 100907 other is 000907, so I suspect they are the same but unsure. Sometimes I've had some with more complete bin sheets that actually tell you the name and price.

Pretty cool that you were at some very early dealerships :)
 
One says 100907 other is 000907, so I suspect they are the same but unsure. Sometimes I've had some with more complete bin sheets that actually tell you the name and price.

Pretty cool that you were at some very early dealerships :)
Yeah, I didn't notice they were the same last 3 digits, but 907 is still a low number when you consider how many there must be now. Some have closed over the decades so some of the numbers may have been re-used, who knows, they wouldn't tell us anyway. Honda of Tampa was the oldest dealership in the area when I was going into high school and Barney's had taken on Hondas after being a marine dealer for a long time. It always amazed me that Honda would even grant a franchise to them, you should have seen the arrangement - they didn't have an indoor showroom, only a parts department. The new bikes were outside in a chain link fenced area under 3 wall cover but the sidewalk ran right next to the fence and in today's world, that fence would be cut overnight and half the bikes would have been gone the next day.

According to a search, there are 965 Honda dealerships today.
 
Thanks Tom and Jim.

Hit 35,555.5 miles and I was sure to get a picture this time!
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So I figured let's replace those studs. I'm only going to be riding for maybe another month. Each one I sprayed, then would loosen about 1/4" turn or so until it felt tight, go loosen, then go back again. If I failed to make progress, spray and start all over.

This worked for all but one. The one that did break it didn't take much. Sprayed some penetrating fluid over it a few times and still couldn't get it to budge. So what I did was go for a ride with the other side tightened, got everything good and hot. Came back, sprayed penetrating fluid again and I was finally able to move that stud with vice grips about 1/4" turn or so. A lot of boring work, but it did come out.

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You have to pay attention to that stud on reassembly, the end with more threads goes on the OUTSIDE (exhaust side).
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I don't normally use anti-seize but this is one of the few times I will. You have to use some common sense here. Get the studs pretty snug and just go a bit more. Otherwise, it's very easy to over-estimate and just snap stuff. I just put the nut on the whole way for the stud and keep tightening after I get the stud started with my fingers. I get it where it starts to get tight then back off the nut, and then go again. Don't want to deal with the nut being stuck there and taking the stud back out with it!
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All new studs and nuts
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Picture of the completely unusable studs and nuts
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I should mention, the reason I got the engine good and hot before attempting removing that stuck stud is that I don't have a cylinder of MAPP gas currently. It was also an excuse to ride around for a bit. :ROFLMAO:
 
I would have done double nuts on the removal but there was no more thread left or barely. Years ago, when my dad helped do the top end gaskets a couple of the studs snapped on removal so he took some off a spare 400T parts bike we had. But yes, good tip.

I'm actually amazed one of the nuts came off by itself and not the entire stud and nut with it with how rusty that thing was. That's what I get for having to store outside when I lived in apartments.
 
Getting ready to ship the cylinder. Per machinist instructions he wanted me to wrap the sleeves in cardboard, otherwise the sleeves may shift in shipping. He said it's more common on air cooled cylinders.

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This will go into a box of the appropriate size, and then an even bigger box that is stronger to protect it.

Pistons, rings, valves, and valve seals will be going in a separate package. Each piece is individually bubbled wrapped then placed into the box. Will also be double boxing due to the rarity of the parts.

Cylinder Head won't be shipped for another month or two. I'll be using my own head as the spares have broken fins in obvious places. However, I will be sending that spare crank for inspection and may end up using it depending on which one is better. Same for the rockers, which look to be serviceable.
 
Getting ready to ship the cylinder. Per machinist instructions he wanted me to wrap the sleeves in cardboard, otherwise the sleeves may shift in shipping. He said it's more common on air cooled cylinders.

This will go into a box of the appropriate size, and then an even bigger box that is stronger to protect it.

Pistons, rings, valves, and valve seals will be going in a separate package. Each piece is individually bubbled wrapped then placed into the box. Will also be double boxing due to the rarity of the parts.

Cylinder Head won't be shipped for another month or two. I'll be using my own head as the spares have broken fins in obvious places. However, I will be sending that spare crank for inspection and may end up using it depending on which one is better. Same for the rockers, which look to be serviceable.
Yep, double boxing is the only way to go to be sure, my carbs and 450 head went coast to coast just fine that way.
 
Cylinder and parts received! Apparently I did a good job on prepping the gasket surfaces.

I'm still actively riding, probably for another couple of weeks. After that I'll send the head out as well and start the "fun" of disassembly with pics of course.
 
I've never seen that one before honestly. Lol.

Anyways. Coming to you live, one thing I'm doing is getting things loose on the bike then finger tightening. Like the valve cover, brackets, and right now the oil cooler itself. The side cover on the oil cover lot of boring back and forth. Stuck in there and I want to replace the gasket. All you can do is back and forth, sometimes a little oil, then do it again.

20231012_174842.jpg
 
OK, it's off/loose. Later will try to get that pressure sensor off, but might just have to leave that on. The starter motor wire is stuck and it's not going to come out without replacing the nuts and bolt so I fished it through and will deal with that later on the bench. The joys of leaving it outside for a few years while living in apartments.
 
More progress before I call it quits for tonight (need to get a new light in there it went out the other day).

Took the oil cooler off, then the starter motor. Years of grime and leaky forks and it's pretty nasty under there. Sprayed some degreaser to start wiping some of it off. Even the starter was filthy. Will get some "after" pictures tomorrow.
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Got the torque converter off. Gaskets were new from a couple of months ago so they're still usable, but I have new ones in stock so I'll use those instead. As always, make sure you don't lose that tiny check valve or you're big time screwed because nobody has it. Be ready with a drain pan as the torque converter is going to seep oil. And don't lose the two needle bearings (they're the same size).

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Since I don't have an engine stand I'd say it's best to remove anything that requires locking the crank like the oil pump gear and the stator. So I did just that. FYI both of these parts use a 17mm. You'll need a breaker bar and a clutch holder. It will be on there tight. Took me a few minutes of goofing around because the clutch holder kept slipping. Will have to upgrade to a better one before reassembly.

20231012_192819.jpg


FYI on oil pump gear reassembly, under that plate is a thrust washer and a dowel pin and the plate has to line all up to this. For now I left this fingertight and will remove it on the bench and taking lots of pictures here because I will definitely forget things.
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Stator is loosened, not removed. Enough for tonight. Tomorrow will remove the stator and top end and hopefully get the engine out and the frame becomes a "roller". Another thing I've been doing this entire time is any kind of things that get removed temporarily, like the battery box, airbox mounts, footpegs, etc. go back on, finger tight because I know I will lose it! Note to self here, the "half moon nut" thing that is under the air box mount felt down in between the motor and centerstand or swingarm. Look for it after engine is removed.

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EDIT: Additonally, the cylinder is machined. When I get the head off, will send it out probably Monday as I have things to do Saturday.
 
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Always good to study the book multiple times before disassembly so there's no surprise. Other things that must come off, unique to the Hondamatics:
  • Kick Idler Gear
  • Kick Starter Pinion
  • Kick Inhibitor Arm
Bill H likely knew all this when he took it apart. I've also read the Honda Common Service Manual we have available here from the library archive. There was a particular piece of good advice that I didn't think about. For complex assemblies they recommend putting it on wire so the order and orientation is not lost or forgotten. I've seen others use things like egg crates, but I think this way is much better. Can easily be hung up or laid carefully on it's side out of the way. With egg crates I'm concerned it could be knocked over or dropped while picking it up and now you've lost parts or things shift around in there and the order gets messed up. Just FYI, I am not taking apart the transmission components unless necessary. It works fine, I feel there is no reason to muck it up.

Capture.PNG

The outside gear on the starter looked good. But I will be taking it apart for new brushes and o-ring. Hopefully it's not too annoying to get it back together. Sometimes it's a pain to get the brushes to stay put. Pictures to come later.

I knew the exhaust would be an issue. I was expecting the collector box would likely crumble on disassembly. It did. So I guess we will find out if DSS' aftermarket exhaust components actually fit and work. I'll be interested in knowing if it has the same design on the inside or if it's simply a hollow box.
 
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More progress this morning. Removed the kickstarter stuff.

Pinion slides right off. ⚠⚠BEWARE THERE IS AN 18.6MM ID THRUST WASHER BEHIND IT. IT MAY BE ATTACHED TO IT. I ALMOST LOST IT!⚠⚠
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Theres a "double coil" ring on the shaft. Its hard to see but find the end then slightly lift up and spin.

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Took hondas advice and used wire. Watch out for the thrust washer, needle bearing and the spacer.
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Now the gear shift and inhibitor assembly. Push down on the inhibitor, notice the spring, dont lose it. Also be mindful of the needle bearings and its thrust washer.
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Worm the gear shifter shaft off. It goes through the engine so make sure shifter lever is removed.
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All parts removed and organized.
20231013_094615.jpg
 
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Interesting view since I've never seen inside one of these. Caged needle bearings on stuff instead of bushings like some of the older twins.
 
Large post incoming, will be broken up into 3 posts because of the image limits (sorry don't trust hosting providers like imgur or photobucket). Let's do that cylinder head.

I pushed the CDI out of the way, put the bolts back in with those cable guides. Also removed the ignition coil and did the same. Then removed the valve cover. (Sorry did that earlier forgot to take a picture).
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Right side
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Left side
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Cam alignment, right side was loose when set at this point on the cam. For reference later.
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Loosen the engine bolts with a 17mm and a breaker bar. You'll probably need an extension for the ones in the back. I know I did. Do it an x-pattern and a little bit at a time. If it feels like it's binding, stop and tighten a bit then go again. You might have to do that a few times.
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Make sure you remove this hanger, it will interfere with you removing the head because of clearance issues.
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I have another head and cylinder, so it's easy for me to keep the bolts and rockers organized for reassembly.
20231013_115031.jpg

Cam chain and cam shaft removal next post.
 
You have to get the bolts off the sprocket. Spin the stator until you get access to one of the bolts and lock the stator with a holder. Remove. Do the same for the other side.

EDIT 10-14-2023: It was suggested that I stuff towels in the cam chain area to prevent the cam chain sprocket bolts from falling down in there. I got cocky and lucky. So make sure you do that.

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Slide the sprocket to the left, now hang the chain with some wire.
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Per the FSM pull the cam shaft to the right. You will have to fool with moving the stator/cam chain and some playing with the sprocket to get the lobes to clear it.
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For future reference, the side with the mark goes on the left on reassembly.
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Cam shaft condition. Actually more worn than the spare. Depending on what the machinist says I may have to get another. Was possibly anticipating this.
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Remove the 10mm nut and washer for the cam chain tensioner on the head. There's an o-ring too, but it's likely a piece of plastic. So I removed after I got the head off.
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Don't forget that holder too.
20231013_120856.jpg


There are reinforcement points for prying. Make sure you're using those areas. I found that I had to pry a bit on one side, then go to the other. Dowel pins and oil just like to make a seal and makes it harder. But it will come off.
20231013_120143.jpg


Coming off...
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At this point, carefully
fish the cam chain through so it doesn't get lost in the abyss.
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Removed. Condition of the valves.
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Next post is Cylinder removal.
 
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Remove the exhaust side cam chain guide. Slides right out.
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Loosen the cam chain tensioner nut on the cylinder until you can get the cam chain tensioner blade moving back and forth easily. Remove the cam chain tensioner circlip and pin. Use towels and go slow so you don't lose parts.
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Got it.
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Remove the whole tensioner assembly. I put the pin and circlip back in it so it doesn't get lost. I also checked the movement of the tensioner. Works as it should.
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Removing the cylinder was the most annoying part for me. There are reinforcements spots at the bottom of the cylinder where you can fit a pry bar. Took a lot of back and forth on both sides and then finally it just popped off.
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Cylinder removed. You'll have to wiggle and watch pistons and rings. Will be a bit difficult from the oil.
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Cylinder condition. Those lines in the one picture are not rust, but some kind of casting for the taper on the bottom.
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Now all that is off, can send head and both cams out. Not sure if I'll drop the engine tonight or tomorrow.
 
Interesting view since I've never seen inside one of these. Caged needle bearings on stuff instead of bushings like some of the older twins.
I guess the idea is that it's easier to replace needle bearings than bushings. I've seen a lot of aftemarket moped con rods switch to this design. Since it's my first time tearing down an engine of this complexity appears normal to me since I have no other background experience on it.
 
Look what showed up that half-moon nut thing for the air box. This is an important piece and I've worked on a fair number of these bikes where it's almost always missing.
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One nice thing I've learned from working flat rate in the body shop is contorting your hand into weird places to avoid having to take other things apart. Normally you'd have to remove the rear fender, or at least flip it forward, to get access to the splash shield so you can put this piece back in. I'm not doing it, so here's what I do.
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While I was at it, added all the left and right side cover stuff back on and the rear pegs so I don't lose this stuff.
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Will have to remove the chain, then stator, and finally the engine. I already removed the front sprocket retainer. Nice thing about the Hondamatic is the parking brake so it easily lock the rear wheel. I will have to check, but it looks like there's a possibility of the rear brake pedal interfering with removing the engine, but we'll see.
 
After most of a lifetime contorting my hands into lots of places where they weren't intended to go, like areas under dashboards while installing car accessories as well as a couple decades of increasingly-smaller under hood areas (and underneath too) doing mechanical work, I'm paying for it now with arthritis in more than a few fingers and knuckles. So be smart and take the long way if and when you can, because the future seems a long way off... until you get there and regret some of the choices. I know, flat rate work and all that, but you're not on flat rate anymore.
 
After most of a lifetime contorting my hands into lots of places where they weren't intended to go, like areas under dashboards while installing car accessories as well as a couple decades of increasingly-smaller under hood areas (and underneath too) doing mechanical work, I'm paying for it now with arthritis in more than a few fingers and knuckles. So be smart and take the long way if and when you can, because the future seems a long way off... until you get there and regret some of the choices. I know, flat rate work and all that, but you're not on flat rate anymore.
I agree. What I do now is if it hurts in any way while trying to do it I just stop and do it the right way. Can't bend as well as I used to.

As a devil's advocate thing here, if you're not doing such contortionist acts often I think you can get away with it. It's when you do it all day as part of your job it catches up to you. But either way, you're right and it's good advice.
 
Always good to study the book multiple times before disassembly so there's no surprise. Other things that must come off, unique to the Hondamatics:
  • Kick Idler Gear
  • Kick Starter Pinion
  • Kick Inhibitor Arm
Bill H likely knew all this when he took it apart. I've also read the Honda Common Service Manual we have available here from the library archive. There was a particular piece of good advice that I didn't think about. For complex assemblies they recommend putting it on wire so the order and orientation is not lost or forgotten. I've seen others use things like egg crates, but I think this way is much better. Can easily be hung up or laid carefully on it's side out of the way. With egg crates I'm concerned it could be knocked over or dropped while picking it up and now you've lost parts or things shift around in there and the order gets messed up. Just FYI, I am not taking apart the transmission components unless necessary. It works fine, I feel there is no reason to muck it up.

View attachment 25451

The outside gear on the starter looked good. But I will be taking it apart for new brushes and o-ring. Hopefully it's not too annoying to get it back together. Sometimes it's a pain to get the brushes to stay put. Pictures to come later.

I knew the exhaust would be an issue. I was expecting the collector box would likely crumble on disassembly. It did. So I guess we will find out if DSS' aftermarket exhaust components actually fit and work. I'll be interested in knowing if it has the same design on the inside or if it's simply a hollow box.
Didn't know the tie wire trick was in there (I should read that sometime) but I've been doing that forever and it sure helps. Another trick (good for starter cases) is to use a Sharpie to mark across case seams to get them oriented the right spot on reassembly or tiny marks with a scratch awl.
 
Interesting view since I've never seen inside one of these. Caged needle bearings on stuff instead of bushings like some of the older twins.
I came across caged needles on the main and counter tranny shafts on the 350 I'm into. They're NLA now but I ordered some 20x26x16 on amazon, probably should have checked McmasterCarr for those and I need to source the NLA oil filter internal 45mm snap rings (1mm thick).

Frank, this thread is a feast of great photo journaling. Thanks man!
 
I came across caged needles on the main and counter tranny shafts on the 350 I'm into. They're NLA now but I ordered some 20x26x16 on amazon, probably should have checked McmasterCarr for those and I need to source the NLA oil filter internal 45mm snap rings (1mm thick).

Frank, this thread is a feast of great photo journaling. Thanks man!
Oh I need to take lots of pictures or ill forget. I get scared of messing up orientation or order. Plus I think its good to have it posted here for whoever decides to tackle this. Jim's guide is quite good, but is more focused on the internals after the engine is off. And I don't see many hondamatic rebuild threads (if at all?). Bill H said there was one he did on the old forum.

FSM is a good reference, but it does assume some prior knowledge. I'm being a bit verbose with the pictures in hope it can be a step by step for someone who is afraid to do it, but needs to.
 
Oh I need to take lots of pictures or ill forget. I get scared of messing up orientation or order. Plus I think its good to have it posted here for whoever decides to tackle this. Jim's guide is quite good, but is more focused on the internals after the engine is off. And I don't see many hondamatic rebuild threads (if at all?). Bill H said there was one he did on the old forum.

FSM is a good reference, but it does assume some prior knowledge. I'm being a bit verbose with the pictures in hope it can be a step by step for someone who is afraid to do it, but needs to.
Verbose? Naw, it's a long ways from being too much, Yeah, the hondamatics are kind of mysterious, so you know it's helping some.
 
Verbose? Naw, it's a long ways from being too much, Yeah, the hondamatics are kind of mysterious, so you know it's helping some.
Thanks for the kind words.

So finally decided to stop being iffy and got that engine out. You have to move that front bracket out of the way or it's not going to happen. The straps on the ceiling beams was unnecessary, but was unsure. Came out nice and easy, and not too heavy to carry to the bench.

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The cases are incredibly filthy from many years of using 90W gear oil as chain lube. I had to stop out at the dealer today to pick up parts, some for @esh21167 but figured I'd grab that big bottle of Hondabrite and give it a try. Does it work? Yes. Does it work better than spraying carb cleaner? Yes. Does it work as well as degreaser? Yes. Is it a miracle cure? No. Used a toothbrush and many paper towels, but it's coming along. Good enough that I can live with it. Some of the case is now stained from the oil over the years. Not a big deal, nobody is going to see it anyways. Just don't want to handle the cases with all that nasty grit on my hands.
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So I have to make some wood blocks for when I flip the case upside down and actually disassemble. In the meantime, let's look at that starter. Getting those screws out are incredibly difficult because they are long, exposed to heat and road crud, and practically guaranteed to have never been disturbed. A T-Handle screwdriver and you supporting the back firmly with your hand or otherwise is a requirement or you will ruin the screws.
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There's alignment marks on the one side of the case. The other it doesn't matter, it will be obvious because of the screws.
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Pretty dirty and lots of old brush dust in there. Spray some carb cleaner or contact cleaner and wipe it out.
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There's a washer that goes on that smaller inside cover with the alignment marks. Don't lose it.
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For the new brushes the side with the insulation goes on the RIGHT side. It matters because the exposed side is obviously the ground/case. So don't goof it up.
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I was pretty sure I ordered new o-rings for the INSIDE of the starter (there's two). But I seem to be unable to locate them. However, I will get them. Will be a while before it goes back on. I did put it back together and tested it. Spins over real nice. Will take the screws back off and finish cleaning the case.
 
Upon checking my spreadsheet I did not order those o-rings. Funny, the parts fiche only shows one, but there's two and they're the same size. It's NLA, but can be found. Says it's a 60 x 1.4. I'll see what MCM has. It's just to keep water and oil out, so being 1.5 isn't going to hurt it.
 
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