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1977 CB200

The business end of the OEM tacho cable looks like this, with a forked internal end that engages with the tacho drive. The countersunk screw that Tom mentions above engages with the waisted portion of the cable outer.

View attachment 28823
It is easy when you know how… you and Tom were exactly right Richard.

So, this is the story: the cable is correct, but it would not seat far enough into the right angle drive due to this lump of completely unnecessary silicone sealer (or similar) a PO had added:

IMG_2843.jpeg

… once I’d realised it was superfluous, and removed it, the cable seated perfectly, more than that I even found the correct countersunk screw in the spares box the PO gave me:

IMG_2842.jpeg

… it all fits perfectly, and the tachometer should work properly now, perhaps for the first time in years. The rev counter not working would have really irritated me. It is so satisfying to sort out these issues, particularly for no cost whatsoever, with parts the PO already had:

IMG_2844.jpeg

… no need for bits of silicone sealer.

This forum is so useful, it would have taken me ages to work this one without it :cool:
 
The original ones would have looked different, they can be caked into those ports.
#5
View attachment 28826
The diagram you posted was really helpful, but it shows me I have a problem:

IMG_2077.gif


… I have two beautiful, new silencers to fit, but what I don’t have is the two mounting brackets, numbered #6 and #7. A PO must have ditched them when the nasty megaphones were fitted. I doubt there is much chance of finding the brackets, but they look pretty simple so I could manufacture some from 2mm sheet I have.

:unsure:

Addendum: well, I’m really surprised, I didn’t think there was much chance of finding the exhaust brackets in stock anywhere, but I’m pleased I was wrong:

Silencer bracket

… brand new parts, both sides delivered for only £20.
 
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… no need for bits of silicone sealer.
It's possible once the engine is running that you'll find it has a small leak from the tach drive, in which case you'll need to replace the seal around the shaft in the base of that cable opening. Many times I've seen sealer applied there it was because someone either didn't know there was a seal on the shaft, or didn't know what to do about it.
This forum is so useful, it would have taken me ages to work this one without it :cool:
Well, we certainly try. :)
 
Oddly enough, I meant to mention the ( lack of ) silencer brackets. I did make a template once with a view to making some, those nice replacements were not around when I put DS CB pipes onto my CL 175. I ended up paying quite a bit more than 20 quid for parts from a breaker that looked as though they had been dredged from the sea bed. Other bits you'll need are the rubber buffers for the side and centre stands, DS had these last time I looked.
 
Here's that tacho drive stripped down. It's from a 175 engine, but only the bearing casting is different to the CB200. Some fiddly washers in there, easily misplaced or put in the wrong order. To replace seal, assembly just pulls out using pliers on the flats. Note the tiny washer on end that goes in first.

6jJ8RBw.jpg


zfM30ay.jpg
 
It is easy when you know how… you and Tom were exactly right Richard.

So, this is the story: the cable is correct, but it would not seat far enough into the right angle drive due to this lump of completely unnecessary silicone sealer (or similar) a PO had added:

View attachment 28832

… once I’d realised it was superfluous, and removed it, the cable seated perfectly, more than that I even found the correct countersunk screw in the spares box the PO gave me:

View attachment 28833

… it all fits perfectly, and the tachometer should work properly now, perhaps for the first time in years. The rev counter not working would have really irritated me. It is so satisfying to sort out these issues, particularly for no cost whatsoever, with parts the PO already had:

View attachment 28834

… no need for bits of silicone sealer.

This forum is so useful, it would have taken me ages to work this one without it :cool:
If you wish to test it first spin a thin screwdriver blade bit in a drill in reverse into the slot in the cable opening that connects to your engine tach drive. The tach or speedo will respond if they are working.
 
Oddly enough, I meant to mention the ( lack of ) silencer brackets. I did make a template once with a view to making some, those nice replacements were not around when I put DS CB pipes onto my CL 175. I ended up paying quite a bit more than 20 quid for parts from a breaker that looked as though they had been dredged from the sea bed. Other bits you'll need are the rubber buffers for the side and centre stands, DS had these last time I looked.
I was amazed that someone was producing new silencer brackets from my 47 year old motorcycle - and is willing to supply them to me for £20 delivered. I imagine a similar motorcycle is still in production somewhere like India or Thailand and the factory owner has spotted a niche in the older motorcycles market. It will be nice to have all new parts fitted - I'll look up the rubber stoppers as DS later today.

:cool:
 
Here's that tacho drive stripped down. It's from a 175 engine, but only the bearing casting is different to the CB200. Some fiddly washers in there, easily misplaced or put in the wrong order. To replace seal, assembly just pulls out using pliers on the flats. Note the tiny washer on end that goes in first.

6jJ8RBw.jpg


zfM30ay.jpg
Thank you Richard. I hope I won't need it, but if I do that will be really useful.
Alan
 
Oddly enough, I meant to mention the ( lack of ) silencer brackets. I did make a template once with a view to making some, those nice replacements were not around when I put DS CB pipes onto my CL 175. I ended up paying quite a bit more than 20 quid for parts from a breaker that looked as though they had been dredged from the sea bed. Other bits you'll need are the rubber buffers for the side and centre stands, DS had these last time I looked.
I realize you had the engine apart, but did you look really closely at the exhaust ports to be completely sure there were no old exhaust gaskets well-crushed and blackened by exhaust yet still in there? It has happened many times over the years and I seriously doubt the pipes would come close to properly sealing against the bare head aluminum in the port without them.
You were of course exactly right Tom, these two were lurking in the exhaust ports covered in soot:

IMG_2847.jpeg

I was really pleased to consign the really horrible megaphone silencers to the bin:

IMG_2840.jpeg

They were really poor quality and didn’t really fit, the gap between the (very good) headers and them was filled with bits of cocoa tin and filler, held together with some industrial clamps from a construction site. They are gone forever and my new silencers will look wonderful (and I hope be far less noisy).

Thank you for the tip about DS stocking the bump stops for the stands Richard, I’ve ordered them along with a pair of the correct clamps for the silencer to header joint. They should be here about the same time as the hanger brackets, so I’ll leave the CB200 project for a few days now.

It is quite satisfying to fix all the bodges a PO has left me. Here is another example, instead of finding the correct M10 bolts a PO has fitted thinner bolts with nuts behind - that catch on the swinging arm (which has been nicely stripped and repainted in the past):

IMG_2846.jpeg
It took moments to fit the correct bolts into the hole that had been threaded to accept them - and so the swinging arm doesn’t catch. I wonder why a PO bothered stripping and painting the frame then couldn’t be arsed to source a few (cheap) fasteners to finish the job.

I’m enjoying this project. I hope the heavy lifting is complete now and I can just spend a bit of time tinkering to iron out the motorcycle’s remaining foibles.

:cool:
 
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Nit picking, but that starter cable appears to routed incorrectly. Needs to be threaded through the frame behind the engine, as the engine is slotted into place. Second photo pinched from CB2NR build thread.

p7j8ZF2.jpg


View attachment 28858
Thank you Richard, I just copied the way it was done previously (I suspect when the frame was painted). I'll bear this in mind for the next time the motor is out of the frame :) .
 
In the past I've seen a few 175's for sale on Ebay with the starter cable hanging off the side like this, and then of course you wonder what other things lurk unseen, as you've discovered.
 
In the past I've seen a few 175's for sale on Ebay with the starter cable hanging off the side like this, and then of course you wonder what other things lurk unseen, as you've discovered.
It is certainly a good indicator that the motor has been out of the frame in the past, but that would be a very common occurrence with a 50 year old machine.
 
Both of my US imports had never been apart, apart from a ham fisted attempt to remove one of the cam journals. That bike had a broken kickstart gear and a burned out starter motor, expect it had then been stuck in a shed and forgotten about. Similarly, the CB175 had been lightly dropped, bent handlebars, broken headlight shell, bent headlamp ears and rear brake pedal, guess that had also been abandoned at that point. Both unmolested by the bodgers. Which is why photographs are so important, as a reminder to put things back together the same way that they came apart. Unlike the CD175 engine I'm currently into, previously owned by a complete cretin.
 
Over the years one thing experience taught me is there is no such thing as a cheap bike. You can buy them cheap, yet a minimum of $1000 to $1500 is going to be needed to bring it to a rider or saleable level.

Most members do inexpensive builds for a variety of reasons which is understandable. I like to watch how different approaches are taken and the learning curves as a project progresses here.
 
Both of my US imports had never been apart, apart from a ham fisted attempt to remove one of the cam journals. That bike had a broken kickstart gear and a burned out starter motor, expect it had then been stuck in a shed and forgotten about. Similarly, the CB175 had been lightly dropped, bent handlebars, broken headlight shell, bent headlamp ears and rear brake pedal, guess that had also been abandoned at that point. Both unmolested by the bodgers. Which is why photographs are so important, as a reminder to put things back together the same way that they came apart. Unlike the CD175 engine I'm currently into, previously owned by a complete cretin.
That is a really good point about taking photographs Richard, and these days there no excuse not to as everyone has a really good camera in their pocket. I took lots of photos as I disassembled the motorcycle - but that did not help me where the previous assembler (I'm guessing the penultimate rather than previous owner) had not put it together correctly. The starter cable is one example (I'll do it right one day when the motor comes out again); the tachometer drive and the passenger foot-pegs are others but there were lots more.

I did know the CB200 had been apart in the past from the photographs the PO provided (from prior to his tenure), so I make no pretence of not knowing there would be some risks.

There is a smug satisfaction to putting things back together properly - particularly when there is no cost and the PO could have done it correctly (sometimes decades ago) if he/she had only known (or bothered to find out) how. That is a great value of this forum: every time I've become stuck on something not explained in the book someone has stepped in to advise - quickly and reliably.

:cool:
 
That is a great value of this forum: every time I've become stuck on something not explained in the book someone has stepped in to advise - quickly and reliably.
Yes, we tend to work at light speed here compared to the response time of the only other player in our field (you know, that other forum).
 
Over the years one thing experience taught me is there is no such thing as a cheap bike. You can buy them cheap, yet a minimum of $1000 to $1500 is going to be needed to bring it to a rider or saleable level.

Most members do inexpensive builds for a variety of reasons which is understandable. I like to watch how different approaches are taken and the learning curves as a project progresses here.
I take your point, but I'm not sure I entirely agree. Take my Goldwing for example, it is a 40 year old GL1200 Aspencade. I bought it as a non-running project for a grand (so by weight it only cost me £1.20/lb), the PO had paid good money for it and spent even more - including a very recent bill for £800 at a motorcycle workshop to get it through the MoT, but he couldn't find the intermittent electrical malady that plagued it and so gave up (I suspect his wife had decided enough was enough). I didn't know what was wrong when I viewed it, but I was pretty sure I could fix it. Sure enough I had the intermittent fault traced in a few days and fixed soon afterwards. The cost to get it back on the road was only about £50 (it was already legal with a recent MoT). I suppose I could have sold it as a slightly rough around the edges Goldwing, but running and riding well for 2 grand, but I like the motorcycle and so have spent another £500 making it nicer because I'll keep it in the longer term.

This little CB200 was cheap (£1,500) and has cost me a bit more than I'd expected (about £250) so far - plus £300 for the new, shiny silencers that I knew I'd need when I bought it. I'm hoping that is the heavy lifting done and a bit of fettling in my spare time will get it to be nice without any great expenses from now on.

In my opinion the important thing with any older motorcar or motorcycle project is to establish one's aim at the very start. I was clear (to myself) that I was not doing a full restoration with this CB200 (exactly as with my Volvo Amazon, the Goldwing and numerous other older vehicles I've owned). I wanted to roll back some decades (about 4 of them) and make the motorcycle a nice runner and rider, sort of like it might have been in about 1985 when on perhaps its second owner. That is still my plan, I'll fix stuff that needs fixing, and put things back to standard where there is no or little cost (apart from my time, which comes free), but I won't chase perfection and have no intention of ever showing any of my cars or bikes.

Baring calamities I should still be able to make the CB200 a nice (but not perfect) motorcycle pretty cheaply. It is almost certainly a bike I'll keep in the longer term and probably won't be sold until I die, but it will be nice to know it owes me a fair bit less than it is worth.

We all have our own ideas about our project bikes and cars - this was just mine (for what that is worth).

:cool:
 
None of my bikes are concourse restorations, I just wanted something that I can ride and tinker with, but still looks reasonably smart. Only things I've ever 'outsourced' are powder coat for the frames, and reboring services. I'm happy to mix and match parts from other years and capacities, and fit after market bits, update and simplify the charging system. Paint comes out of a rattle can.

My CL175 is the only one that I could sell on with a clear conscience, all numbers correct etc. The CB175 has had it's frame swapped by me, replica VIN plate attached, and the SL175 is a complete hotchpot of parts, both will either go to my grave with me, or get broken for spares. Both ARE registered with the DVLA and insured, so they are legal in that respect, but would confuse an inquisitive future owner.
 
no such thing as a cheap bike

Take my Goldwing for example

Thinking goldwings are the exception. Many times seen dirt cheap relative to condition , original cost, and current like-bike. They are normally older. But seems to be "the last bike" , the freeway sofa, and gets put away, running fine, when one's body does no longer. Annecdote from southern california.

And of course there are the got-aways. A running low mileage '74 cb200 no dents with full windshield and luggage racks was sold locally in summer 2019 for $500, with no back fees if you know what that is. Kick self.
 
Thinking goldwings are the exception. Many times seen dirt cheap relative to condition , original cost, and current like-bike. They are normally older. But seems to be "the last bike" , the freeway sofa, and gets put away, running fine, when one's body does no longer. Annecdote from southern california.

And of course there are the got-aways. A running low mileage '74 cb200 no dents with full windshield and luggage racks was sold locally in summer 2019 for $500, with no back fees if you know what that is. Kick self.
You have a point about cheap bikes (and motor cars) in that it almost never makes sense to restore them. I've come across many folk, particularly with older Volvos, whom have acquired an Amazon, 140 or early 240 that looks more or less okay thinking that they will turn it into a show car with a few weekends work. They mostly give up and sell their project still jacked up on axle stands for cents on the dollar a few years later; those that do finish find they have spent £35,000 (to be largely hidden from the wife) and it has taken 3 years of their lives. If one wants a very good (show type) older motorcycle or motor car it is generally good advice to buy one that someone else has already paid to restore because it never makes financial sense to do it oneself.

With my car and bike projects (I always have a few on the go) I generally look for schemes where someone else has spent good money getting the expensive stuff right, but has given up before getting over that last few hurdles. I also never attempt to restore things to as new, it is never worthwhile and just leads to frustration (and an empty wallet). I find that way I get to own and enjoy some interesting older vehicles (I like those from the 1960-1980 era). and pretty well always at least break even at the end of the experience (generally even make a few bob to fund the next project).

It is 06:30 and so Bob (the dog) walking time.

:cool:
 
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Thinking goldwings are the exception. Many times seen dirt cheap relative to condition , original cost, and current like-bike. They are normally older. But seems to be "the last bike" , the freeway sofa, and gets put away, running fine, when one's body does no longer. Annecdote from southern california.

And of course there are the got-aways. A running low mileage '74 cb200 no dents with full windshield and luggage racks was sold locally in summer 2019 for $500, with no back fees if you know what that is. Kick self.
Interesting fact about the Goldwings is the only faster bike in 1975 was the Kawasaki KZ1000. They were never designed as freeway sofas and didn’t originally come from Honda with a full Tupperware kit until 1980. My 1984 GL1200 is 1 of only 5000 built in the standard design with no Tupperware, just a naked bike from the factory as originally conceived in 1975.

Your assessment is bang on with todays purchase price and perceived value.
 
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Interesting fact about the Goldwings is the only faster bike in 1975 was the Kawasaki KZ1000. They were never designed as freeway sofas and didn’t originally come from Honda with a full Tupperware kit until 1980. My 1984 GL1200 is 1 of only 5000 built in the standard design with no Tupperware, just a naked bike from the factory as originally conceived in 1975.

Your assessment is bang on with todays purchase price and perceived value.
Good points. Things were a bit different back in 1975 though: 500s were still considered big bikes and 750s were still superbikes. I suspect Mr Honda saw the way the market was going by 1980 (more and more outrageous superbikes) and realised the inherent design of the Goldwing was not going to be able to compete on that playing field. The Goldwing did lend itself well to adding a bit (later quite a lot) of Tupperware though - so that is the way the range moved.

Your Goldwing sounds like a lovely motorcycle, but I like my Aspencade just because it is so different to almost everything else. It is such a big motorcycle (800lbs) that the Tupperware doesn't detract from it... even the radio seems like a sensible fitment, whereas it would be absurd on any of my other motorcycles.

This is a really interesting discussion, it is good to hear others' views on older bikes.

Alan :cool:
 
One pace forward… one step back - such is the way with 50 year old machines.

The exhaust hangers, clamps and rubber stops showed up with the postie this morning, they all appeared to be of excellent quality, so I thought I’d have the new silencers fitted in a jiffy.

I assembled everything loosely and offered up the right hand exhaust - only to find the holes for the hangers would not line up with those on the frame brackets:

IMG_2848.jpeg

… the silencers sit about an inch and a half too far rearwards. The silencers themselves seem to be perfect, as you may see from the distance between the hangers and the cutout for the rear wheel spindle:

IMG_2849.jpeg

The issue is with the header pipes, and in particular these collars that seem to be fitted about and inch and a half too close to the open end of the pipe:

IMG_2850.jpeg

… as you may see there is only about a 30mm space between the collars and the end of the pipe, but on photos of other headers I’ve seen online that distance seems much larger - and the silencers would seem to be able to accept more pipe protruding into them than did the old megaphones.

It looks like the collars are spot welded on in 4 places around their circumference, so I think I’m probably going to have to (very carefully) cut through them with a Dremmel, then file the remIns of the spot welds flat.

Just when I thought I was out of the woods with my 47 year old Honda twin :cautious:
 
The 'dent's at the rear of the silencer are meant to align with the rear axle. You can either do as you have suggested, or simply cut off the exhaust pipes at that point. The silencers sold by DS are longer than the OEM parts at the joint end. It is good that you have been able to reuse the original double skinned header pipes. Replica ones are single skinned and 'blue' very quickly at the cylinder head end, but they do easily fit to the replica silencers.

I've got two sets of those silencers. I had to return one for replacement under warranty as the internal baffling was loose and rattled. Same thing had also happened with another one, but in that case I fixed it by screwing a stainless self tapper through the outer skin into the baffle assembly. When this happened with a second pipe I thought enough was enough and returned it.
 
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The 'dent's at the rear of the silencer are meant to align with the rear axle. You can either do as you have suggested, or simply cut off the exhaust pipes at that point. The silencers sold by DS are longer than the OEM parts at the joint end.
Thank you or that - which explains the mis-alignment.

Yes, the dent at the rear will align with the spindle when the holes in the hanger plates do - the offset is the same. I'll measure tomorrow and see if just cutting off enough material to get get rid of the collars will leave sufficient to seal inside the silencers - if so that would certainly be easier than grinding off 8 spot welds.

Alan :cool:
 
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DS pipes on my CB175 with Honda header pipes. Note position of silencer to pipe joint, further forward than original setup. Second photo shows bike as received, with those downpipes and original rusted out silencers. Joint on those aligns with foot peg bar.

uG7ej5g.jpg


3qP7iwK.jpg
 
DS pipes on my CB175 with Honda header pipes. Note position of silencer to pipe joint, further forward than original setup. Second photo shows bike as received, with those downpipes and original rusted out silencers. Joint on those aligns with foot peg bar.

uG7ej5g.jpg


3qP7iwK.jpg
That is really helpful Richard - thank you.
 
It was easy enough to drill out the 4 spot welds on each header, then the collars just knocked off:

IMG_2854.jpeg

I then had to trim 20mm from the end of each header, but that provided good penetration into the new silencers. The system took quite a bit of fettling to get everything to fit, but it looks a treat:

IMG_2855.jpeg

That is so much better than the cheap and nasty megaphones a PO had fitted. I may not have time to get everything back together this week - I’m away at the rugby in Bristol this weekend, so the next instalment may not be for a few days. I want to check the ignition timing and then get the carburettors tuned and balanced next - then see what other jobs my 47 year old motorcycle throws up.

:cool:
 
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Making some very rapid progress here. I see that the DS rubber buffers have arrived already !

Another PO bodge - looks like they've run the switch gear wiring externally, given up on threading them inside the handlebars as Honda did.
 
Making some very rapid progress here. I see that the DS rubber buffers have arrived already !

Another PO bodge - looks like they've run the switch gear wiring externally, given up on threading them inside the handlebars as Honda did.
Yes, the DS rubber bump stops and pipe clamps came in the mail; DS is a really good resource, the parts were not expensive and the service is very good indeed.

You are right about the wiring - it needs quite a bit of tidying up, but that is a job for another day :cool:

Another thing I noticed is that the speedometer and tachometer have different coloured dials - no matter, I have a spare pair that match each other in the spares box - a job for another day :)

Alan
 
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Making some very rapid progress here. I see that the DS rubber buffers have arrived already !

Another PO bodge - looks like they've run the switch gear wiring externally, given up on threading them inside the handlebars as Honda did.
I had a quick look at this when I got back from Bristol this afternoon (a fantastic match - neither team bothered defending very much); the score was:

IMG_2858.jpeg

… which (for those that don’t follow the rugby) is an astonishing score for a professional match.

So, it looks (to me) like a PO has replaced the handlebars because there are no holes for the cables to run through, but it looks like there should be. A PO has hacked a bit out of the aluminium casing of the switch at the bottom to allow the cables to pass through. The wiring has been bodged a bit also: the black and black/white wires have been shorted (so the kill switch is bypassed), the yellow/red wire becomes green and is soldered to the starter switch (it seems to work fine) and the blue, white and yellow/blue wires for the high/low beam are present and seem to be properly connected.

IMG_2860.jpeg

I’ll tidy up the twisted together wires with some solder and shrink tube for now, but in the fullness of time I’ll take this arrangement apart and reinstate everything the way it should be with the wires running through the handlebars (I’ll drill some holes like Mr Honda did).

One step at a time though :cool:

Addendum: Good result in the cricket also: we beat India by 28 runs in the first test. For those that don’t follow the cricket that is an exceptional result for any touring team in India . Well done England!
 
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The CB200 runs and rides:

The CB200 runs and rides!

So, it is back together with re-bored barrels, new pistons and rings, plus a myriad of other things put right or noted for future work. Something is a bit noisy at tickover in the motor - perhaps the cam chain, maybe just a tappet? That needs a bit more investigation. I‘m pleased the motorcycle is running, it starts easily, ticks over at just under 2,000 RPM, the clutch and gears work, as do the brakes. All the lights work apart from the brake light from the front lever (there is a new switch on its way) and the horn needs some investigation.

The new silencers (mufflers) are an huge improvement and even the tachometer works properly!

That is enough time spent on this project for the time being. I have a few other things to take care of (like completing on the purchase of another house that will require a little attention on Wednesday), so the CB200 can wait a little while until I get time to do a bit more fettling. I‘m quite pleased that it is (at the very least) a good basis for improvement.

:cool:
 
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The video sounds like cam chain adjustment to me, otherwise sounds good.
Thank you, I agree it does sound like that. I probably won’t have a chance to do any more fettling this week, so here is my ‘to do’ list for when I get back to it:

1. Adjust the cam chain.
2. Check and adjust the tappets (I bought a really natty tool for adjusting the tappets on small engines - a 3mm square drive surrounded by an 8mm socket).
3. Check the ignition timing (with a strobe).
4. Balance the carburettors (with a manometer).
5. Fit the new front lever brake light switch (on order).
6. Rewire the handlebar switches, routing the wires through the ‘bars.
7. Fix the horn.

If points 1 and 2 don’t make the motor mechanically quiet I may have to change the cam chain. It would be easy to argue I should have done that when I had the motor apart, but it wouldn’t take me long to get the motor out and stripped a second time and would only cost me a cam chain and a bag of gaskets. I could route the starter cable the right way (as Richard showed) at the same time.

:cool:
 
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If you are talking about the surface which the rim of the cap meets, there is supposed to be an o ring there, should be replaced. Also looks like replacement cap may be available on cmsnl.
And for planning ahead, may want to acquire this tool.
51owGxjjHEL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
Thank you. Would that be the same tool as this one:

Clutch removal tool.

Alan
 
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Certainly looks the same as the one DS sell for twice the price. Don't know why they call it a 'clutch nut' tool though, it's actually for removing the crankshaft nut holding the oil spinner on. Here's an alternative:

 
Certainly looks the same as the one DS sell for twice the price. Don't know why they call it a 'clutch nut' tool though, it's actually for removing the crankshaft nut holding the oil spinner on. Here's an alternative:

Thank you Richard. Would that be the only special tool I might need if I change the cam chain?

Alan
 
Certainly looks the same as the one DS sell for twice the price. Don't know why they call it a 'clutch nut' tool though, it's actually for removing the crankshaft nut holding the oil spinner on. Here's an alternative:

The little 90's and smaller have that nut on the centrifugal clutches.
 
It’s also used on many Honda clutch baskets to attach the basket to the transmission output shaft. So if your fleet grows down the road you may have other uses for it on those models. ;)
 
Would that be the only special tool I might need

Possibly ignition switch tool,

for the front wheel. I just used an adjustable spanner.



Thank you. Would that be the same tool as this one


079162830000, which is called for in the manual, is 24mm internal Ø

 
Possibly ignition switch tool,

for the front wheel. I just used an adjustable spanner.






079162830000, which is called for in the manual, is 24mm internal Ø

I bought that same one. Very handy and affordable.
 
It’s also used on many Honda clutch baskets to attach the basket to the transmission output shaft. So if your fleet grows down the road you may have other uses for it on those models. ;)
Thank you (and to all those who have advised about tools). I suspect this will not be the only air-cooled Honda twin I own in the next few years so I'll acquire the tools in slow time.

Alan :cool:
 
Don't know what anyone else thinks, but a quick and dirty way to fit a new cam chain without splitting the cases would be to break the chain at the top end then use it to pull the new chain through, re joining the chain using a rivet link. Would that work ?

There used to be ( possibly still is ? ) a UK chap who offered a mobile service for changing motorcycle cam chains, must have done it that way.

You'd need a chain riveting tool if you did it that way.

sMUK3zp.jpg


L8bSyBC.jpg
 
DS sells the correct length endless chain for the CB200 engine and the correct soft rivet links if you need to break it. These links are pretty fool proof ( well, I managed it !), outer plate sits against shoulders, so you can't make the link too tight, as is possible when riveting some 'O' ring chains, like on my CB600. Second pic below shows link with one side riveted, other side waiting to be done.

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JWG18vp.jpg
 
DS sells the correct length endless chain for the CB200 engine and the correct soft rivet links if you need to break it. These links are pretty fool proof ( well, I managed it !), outer plate sits against shoulders, so you can't make the link too tight, as is possible when riveting some 'O' ring chains, like on my CB600. Second pic below shows link with one side riveted, other side waiting to be done.

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I think that would work Richard, I’ve broken and riveted lots of final drive chains on my larger bikes, so I have the right riveting tool.

I would seem to be 216 size chain (lots of karts use that for drives), 84 links long. That would be a pretty easy job that would only take a few hours. I’ll look up the DS product.

Alan

Addendum: I’m guessing this is the DS product to which you were referring Richard:

DS cam chain

… that looks like a perfectly good solution.
 
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