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1972 CB450 K5 Hot Mess

RobMan

Veteran Member
Joined
Feb 4, 2024
Total Posts
420
Total likes
292
Location
Burlington, NC USA
Had a great welcome to the forum and wanted to move my restoration/resurrection progress to the proper location as @ancientdad suggested. I am sure there will times I wish I could lay hands on the beast and holler "Heal" and that will be when I reach out to all the good people here! Recap is I had finished bringing a 65 Honda S90 back to life last summer and started having a serious itch for a winter project. Saw a 72 CB450 post on Craigslist and from the pics it needed a lot of love. Bike had been sitting in a shed since the 80's and obviously had a major incident and engine appeared to be sized as well. See my welcome thread for a lot of great discussion, observation and advice from many members.

Here are a couple of images from the Craigslist add. Note the dent in the tank and crash bar bent back on the left as well as the broken chain.
CB450-2.jpgCB450-1.jpg

After I got it home pulled the the drive cover I was able to get the chain loose where it was jammed up and was then able to kick the engine over and and it has compression!
IMG_4093-1.jpg

Pulled the engine yesterday and got it on a hand truck and after sealing the crankcase vent, intake and exhaust ports with extra thick gasket material I did as as @wentwest suggested I rolled it over to an area that wouldn't upset the wife and I sprayed it down with engine de-greaser and cranked up the pressure washer.

IMG_4098-1.jpg

After a closer examination of the bike after pulling the engine and and cleaning it I can safely say it "was rode hard and put up wet". The engine has been disassembled at one time and all the fasteners were probably thrown in a coffee can as many of them look like they are in the wrong locations and are using washers were it didn't call for one. Also note the marked bolt location, head is gone, been drilled and although I can't see for sure I bet there is the tip of an easy out in there. I am hoping I can just pull the cases apart off the bolt shank later and remove it with time, PB Blaster and a good pair of vice grips.

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Anyway this is it up this point. I am torn between starting the engine tear down or starting breaking the frame down check the forks and running gear. Oh well I have other chores to do at the moment so will decide later.
 
Well, if it wasn't too obvious before, it is now - that engine needs to be completely disassembled. JIS screws in the cam chain tensioner, hadn't seen that one until today, and a 6mm lower case bolt with the head drilled off is a new one too. I'm sure you're in for many more surprises, so be sure to take a ton of pics and post them as you go so we can spot stuff you might not recognize as issues (I use the plural term just based on the current visual :) ).
 
The engine has been disassembled at one time and all the fasteners were probably thrown in a coffee can as many of them look like they are in the wrong locations and are using washers were it didn't call for one.
Hey, I resemble this remark. :ROFLMAO: I toss all my nuts/bolts/washer into a coffee can for later cleaning while disassembling an engine. Then each gets cleaned and inspected for garbage or use after replating. Assembly is a completely different process where using the fiche the correct bolts are used.
 
Well, if it wasn't too obvious before, it is now - that engine needs to be completely disassembled. JIS screws in the cam chain tensioner, hadn't seen that one until today, and a 6mm lower case bolt with the head drilled off is a new one too. I'm sure you're in for many more surprises, so be sure to take a ton of pics and post them as you go so we can spot stuff you might not recognize as issues (I use the plural term just based on the current visual :)
 
:) Thanks for heads up on the tensioner housing screws, I had not noticed that yet. Considering the number of mismatches I have seen so far I am going to have to do a one by one match up of fasteners. Hopefully they did not force a fastener and crack the housing. I am planning on buying a new Allen bolt/screw set but it would have been nice to have the old one correct to match up. Do you have a suggestion on the best/most-affordable complete set?
 
Hey, I resemble this remark. :ROFLMAO: I toss all my nuts/bolts/washer into a coffee can for later cleaning while disassembling an engine. Then each gets cleaned and inspected for garbage or use after replating. Assembly is a completely different process where using the fiche the correct bolts are used.
At least you have a process for making sure the correct screw/bolt goes back into the correct place. In this case I am starting to wonder if they could only afford one coffee can for all their projects and just grab and try different fasteners until one works.
 
That a familiar sight! It's a definite tear down. I'm just now getting past the worst of it on mine.

Somewhere around the shop I have my original fastener order list. A ton of mine looked like yours and I replaced everything except the lower engine mount bolts with new from a combination of Bolt Depot, Monster Bolts and Tractor Supply (sneaky good weird hardware selection, just FYI). I went through the schematics and added up all the 6x25/40/12/16/10, etc and just bought a big ol box of nuts, washers and bolts - and also replaced the JIS screws wherever I could (personal preference).

It's close to 1500 fasteners in all, but definitely worth it. There are quite a few sets out there to replace the external "show" fasteners (crankcase covers, etc), but I couldn't find anything that was a complete all-in set.

I'd also invest in some of this stuff:
Evaporust Gel

Works way better than the liquid version, clings to the surface and does its thing.

On some of the nastier bolts, I paint a little of that on the head and mating surfaces and let it sit overnight. At the very least it cleans up the head and gives a better surface to grab, also breaks some of the corrosion tension at the mating surface. Between that, penetrating oil, patience and heat, just about everything can be brought out without snapping. Also works really well on spokes and weird nooks and crannies.

In hindsight, I should have held off on a predictive parts order, just done the engine tear down and figured out what I actually needed from there. My method left a heck of a lot of spares... the cost of impatience.
 
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I am planning on buying a new Allen bolt/screw set
Just be aware that if you do use allen heads, you can easily over-torque some bolts and end up with stripped aluminum threads, or in the case of the points screws, a stripped points plate which are NLA and good ones are hard to find (and NOS with new points on one is way over $100)
 
I ordered the upper and lower Allen bolt kit from Common Motor. They come with printed out diagrams on where every bolt goes. That was very helpful. I had mismatched screws/bolts on my engine as well.

On the other hand, as ancientdad said above, it is easy to over-torque those Allen bolts. We don’t know what damage has already been done to the threading previously. I stripped a thread on one of my intake valve cover bolts. Then I stripped out an Allen screw on my points plate. It was a shameful experience because I am always careful. I also used anti-seize, which also probably lubed the screws to tighten even more.
 
Though I know most today find the JIS screws annoying, the beauty of them is twofold - original appearance which to me is nice, and because they're JIS heads it's hard to over-torque them even with the proper tools (and I use a JIS T-handle, not only gets them really tight but it makes removal a lot easier than whacking an impact driver for every screw)
 
That a familiar sight! It's a definite tear down. I'm just now getting past the worst of it on mine.

Somewhere around the shop I have my original fastener order list. A ton of mine looked like yours and I replaced everything except the lower engine mount bolts with new from a combination of Bolt Depot, Monster Bolts and Tractor Supply (sneaky good weird hardware selection, just FYI). I went through the schematics and added up all the 6x25/40/12/16/10, etc and just bought a big ol box of nuts, washers and bolts - and also replaced the JIS screws wherever I could (personal preference).

It's close to 1500 fasteners in all, but definitely worth it. There are quite a few sets out there to replace the external "show" fasteners (crankcase covers, etc), but I couldn't find anything that was a complete all-in set.

I'd also invest in some of this stuff:
Evaporust Gel

Works way better than the liquid version, clings to the surface and does its thing.

On some of the nastier bolts, I paint a little of that on the head and mating surfaces and let it sit overnight. At the very least it cleans up the head and gives a better surface to grab, also breaks some of the corrosion tension at the mating surface. Between that, penetrating oil, patience and heat, just about everything can be brought out without snapping. Also works really well on spokes and weird nooks and crannies.

In hindsight, I should have held off on a predictive parts order, just done the engine tear down and figured out what I actually needed from there. My method left a heck of a lot of spares... the cost of impatience.
I am trying very hard to be methodical and not get ahead of myself by buying anything before I really see what I getting into. I have started compiling a list of parts I know I will need.
 
Just be aware that if you do use allen heads, you can easily over-torque some bolts and end up with stripped aluminum threads, or in the case of the points screws, a stripped points plate which are NLA and good ones are hard to find (and NOS with new points on one is way over $100)
Good point on the over-torque. There is always a small hollow in the pit of the stomach when you feel the screw or bolt go slack all of a sudden and I already know this machine has been abused a bit.
 
Good point on the over-torque. There is always a small hollow in the pit of the stomach when you feel the screw or bolt go slack all of a sudden and I already know this machine has been abused a bit.
In fact, it reminds me to give you added caution on all the valve cover bolt holes. After a few decades of ham-handed people working on them the threads can get pretty soft, so if you're careful and do feel one start to get soft you can usually get away with a slightly longer bolt, about 4 threads or so. I've done it more than a few times, even had to do it on the left exhaust valve stem seal retainer bolt in my red 450. Better than buying yet another used/abused head, especially when yours is ported.
 
In fact, it reminds me to give you added caution on all the valve cover bolt holes. After a few decades of ham-handed people working on them the threads can get pretty soft, so if you're careful and do feel one start to get soft you can usually get away with a slightly longer bolt, about 4 threads or so. I've done it more than a few times, even had to do it on the left exhaust valve stem seal retainer bolt in my red 450. Better than buying yet another used/abused head, especially when yours is ported.

I've tried to remember to make sure any closed end threaded bolt holes are cleaned out of whatever stuff might have gotten packed in at the base over the last 50 years. It's just a poke in there with a tiny flat blade screwdriver, twist it around against the bottom of the hole, then blow out whatever you might loosen up.
 
PB-Blaster is a good penetrating oil, better than WD-40, but I read a clinical study where those and several more were tested against each other and the strongest most penetrating of them all is Liquid Wrench. I've got and use all three depending on the situation...
 
PB-Blaster is a good penetrating oil, better than WD-40, but I read a clinical study where those and several more were tested against each other and the strongest most penetrating of them all is Liquid Wrench. I've got and use all three depending on the situation...
I read a similar study online and they said the Liquid Wench has a special ingredient in it the other's don't have:I use it for my very stubborn stuff(shake first)when it needs many applications with plenty of time to let it work.
 
I have tried all 3 and I save WD40 for when I need to lightly lube something more than as an penetrating oil. I have used PB Blaster and Liquid Wrench over the years and PB Blaster is my go to. My biggest problem is having the patience to let it work. :)
 
PB Blaster also seems to handle direct heat a bit better. I’ve always liked the combo of PB setting in under a heat gun for really stuck stuff.
 
Drained the oil today. No comments on my engine stand I had rigged to get to the drain plug. Speaking of the drain plug it had seen some serious abuse and the bolt head was almost perfectly round. I think there was one flat side. Ended up using a pipe wrench to get it loose. Sigh.

IMG_4111-1.jpgIMG_4112-1.jpg
 
I see you went for the upgraded version with 4X4’s instead of the base model 2X’s. Nice! Heck, I’ve installed a $9K rear end in a C10 with shadier looking apparatuses.

Resist the urge to immediately replace that. It’s part of the $15-$25 part club that are relatively easy to source but shipping a few at a time when you find them really starts adding up. I’m going to smoke my build budget for a multitude of reasons, but shipping alone has been at least a few hundred so far.

The really hard stuff to find (in my experience so far doing a total basketcase of mismatched stuff) is any OE carb brass in good shape, and pretty much anything with the valve train. I’m sure trim parts too, but the only thing I’ll have left on the bike is the tank and the battery box and even that I’m not 100% certain actually belongs to a K7.

If I could hit rewind, I’d set up EBay alerts for pretty much every part number on the CMSNL diagram for valves, cam followers, torsion springs, etc. it’s almost a guarantee that something there is going to be cooked.
 
I see you went for the upgraded version with 4X4’s instead of the base model 2X’s. Nice! Heck, I’ve installed a $9K rear end in a C10 with shadier looking apparatuses.

Resist the urge to immediately replace that. It’s part of the $15-$25 part club that are relatively easy to source but shipping a few at a time when you find them really starts adding up. I’m going to smoke my build budget for a multitude of reasons, but shipping alone has been at least a few hundred so far.

The really hard stuff to find (in my experience so far doing a total basketcase of mismatched stuff) is any OE carb brass in good shape, and pretty much anything with the valve train. I’m sure trim parts too, but the only thing I’ll have left on the bike is the tank and the battery box and even that I’m not 100% certain actually belongs to a K7.

If I could hit rewind, I’d set up EBay alerts for pretty much every part number on the CMSNL diagram for valves, cam followers, torsion springs, etc. it’s almost a guarantee that something there is going to be cooked.
I grew up before zip ties and duct tape was something we only dreamed of. Speaking of a C10, after a ball joint and tie rod end replacement we would compress the coil springs by lowering the pickup frame down on it and then tying it up with bailing wire. Kinda felt like handling a bomb working it into position in the spring retainers. Cutting the wire was always fun though. Yeah hanging on to the plug, it will go back in just fine with vice grips. I am starting a parts list of things I know I will need and will let it grow before I order anything. I have a lead on a K5 parts engine and and odds and ends so going to see if I can get the seller to come down a bit. :)
 
Haha! I still will do that today in a pinch. Now I’m smart enough to put the spring inside a cinder block first - that way you can at least have a rough idea which way it’ll launch itself.
 
It doesn't seem to matter how carefully I try to predict what I'll need in the next steps of rebuilding this K0 engine I have. An order shows up, I start to get to work and ... Oh crap, I need two more of this and another that and I guess while I'm doing this I should replace the (fill in the blanks), too.
 
I have question, I have a lead on CL450 K4 engine and I have a CB450 early K5. From a quick scan at the parts manual it looks like most parts should be interchangeable. Would that be a fair assessment? Appreciate your thoughts.
 
I have question, I have a lead on CL450 K4 engine and I have a CB450 early K5. From a quick scan at the parts manual it looks like most parts should be interchangeable. Would that be a fair assessment? Appreciate your thoughts.
Other than the engine number stamped on the left side of the upper case, those engines are virtually identical. There may be some minor changes to some internal parts, as Honda did in an ongoing fashion as needed, but you'll have a potential full supply of spares if all is in good condition. To get an idea of how it was treated, check these two things first: pull the exhaust valve cover and look at the cam lobes, and then pull the oil filter cover and see how much buildup there is in the oil filter cup.
 
Other than the engine number stamped on the left side of the upper case, those engines are virtually identical. There may be some minor changes to some internal parts, as Honda did in an ongoing fashion as needed, but you'll have a potential full supply of spares if all is in good condition. To get an idea of how it was treated, check these two things first: pull the exhaust valve cover and look at the cam lobes, and then pull the oil filter cover and see how much buildup there is in the oil filter cup.
Thank you! That is what I was thinking but I appreciate the confirmation.
 
Thank you! That is what I was thinking but I appreciate the confirmation.
There’s also an appendix at the end of the FSM that gives some of the model year to model year changes. There was some evolution on the carbs over time. I v can’t remember if it’s the K6 or K7 that they changed to the 723, and idle screws/idle jet types changed over that time. Speaking of corroded carbs, be super careful pulling the jets out of the little towers, the stepped threads inside are super weak. I ended up having to replace one carb body because, well I had two lefts for one, and one of them stripped out just unscrewing the jet - chunks of threads came out with the jet.
 
Your project is screaming for a parts motor to help you out. If you can find a donor for parts (like the K4 CL450 you mention) buy it! Even better if you can grab one in the $100 or so range. Money well spent.
 
Picked it up today as well as a couple of totes of misc parts and a extra rear wheel. I can already see several parts I need so it probably already paid for itself. :)
 
Nice.
Pictures? C'mon, we'd be in your garage looking at it with you right now if we could. :ROFLMAO:
:LOL: Hey just got home a bit ago and gotta eat some dinner and get some strength build up to unload that rascal. I plan on laying everything out so I can get a good inventory and I will definitely post pictures! BTW has anybody noticed that for some reason Honda engines get heavier as the years go on. Got to be some obscure law of physics! I mean can't be me right???
 
:LOL: Hey just got home a bit ago and gotta eat some dinner and get some strength build up to unload that rascal.
Fine, go eat. We'll wait. :rolleyes: :LOL:
BTW has anybody noticed that for some reason Honda engines get heavier as the years go on. Got to be some obscure law of physics! I mean can't be me right???
It's just you... LOL
Nah, I used to be able to lift a 450 engine to the bench. Last time I tried that about 5 years ago or so, I got it about 6 inches from setting it on the bench, lost balance of it and dropped it upside down on the head. Fortunately it was on the rubber mat in front of my bench so all it did was cracked the top screw hole in the right intake cam bearing and broke the head right off the screw. Enough of that crap, I have way too much time and money invested to be doing stupid stuff like that again. Gettin' old sucks, but the alternative sucks more.
 
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Fine, go eat. We'll wait. :rolleyes: :LOL:

It's just you... LOL
Nah, I used to be able to lift a 450 engine to the bench. Last time I tried that about 5 years ago or so, I got it about 6 inches from setting it on the bench, lost balance of it and dropped it upside down on the head. Fortunately it was on the rubber mat in front of my bench so all it did was cracked the top screw hole in the right intake cam bearing and broke the head right off the screw. Enough of that crap, I have way too much time and money invested to be doing stupid stuff like that again. Gettin' old sucks, but the alternative sucks more.
:unsure::cautious::eek:
 
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At least when you start taking things off the engine it does get lighter. Take off the starter and you'll feel like the engine grew wings. Take off the head and it'll be way better. The center magnet part of the alternator is another big lump. The only problem is when you take apart an engine it explodes from about a cubic foot of heavy metal to half a garage full of boxes, baggies and tubs.
 
At least when you start taking things off the engine it does get lighter. Take off the starter and you'll feel like the engine grew wings. Take off the head and it'll be way better. The center magnet part of the alternator is another big lump. The only problem is when you take apart an engine it explodes from about a cubic foot of heavy metal to half a garage full of boxes,
Space is a big issue for me which of course leads into the biggest issue money. We have a 2 car garage but for some silly reason my better half thinks we should actually park our cars in it. I do have a workbench at the rear but kinda cramped. I was jealous of the guys shop where I bought the engine. It was big enough that he had his hot rod, another car at the lift and plenty of space for the 3 750 Hondamatics he has and of course the required equipment and tools. With that said my wife is totally cool with upgrading our storage building or even getting a 2nd one so no whining!
 
Think vertical. I have the same issue in my “shop” which is basically an oversized one car garage. If I’ve got multiple things cooking it gets really tight and scattered. The bike makes it look like I’ve got space. When I have the truck in, I’ve got to watch what I eat just to get around the hood to the door.

Reclaimed or used commercial storage racks are really cheap and accommodate totes and boxes, weird shaped parts, etc and you can put all your weird hardware and parts at eye level, making it much harder for the little elves that like to hide your 10mm sockets and that part you were looking for. Plus, you can get about 60 sqft of storage out of 12sqft of real estate.

I’d love to do an external building to keep project creep from sliding into the kitchen and dining room - just know that when you open the door to that rabbit hole stuff like welders and drill presses start showing up and act as a beacon for basketcases.
 
OK to satisfy @ancientdad and anyone else that is curious here are some pics of the loot. I have found several items that I am sure I will need already. There are obviously a few items that found their way into the bins and boxes that never started life on a Honda 450 such as the Yamaha petcock. (see if you can find it).

IMG_4116-1.jpgIMG_4117-1.jpgIMG_4120-1.jpgIMG_4121-1.jpg
 
Nice score, lots of good stuff there. The Yamaha petcock looks to be the one to the right of the 450 footpegs, the other near the brake disc looks to be for the 450. Your pictures don't zoom in as much as some so I'm educatedly guessing. You got the later style kickstart lever that articulates at the bottom, and you got a nearly pristine alternator cover, a rarity these days. Mine was shifter-gouged pretty badly.
 
Nice score, lots of good stuff there. The Yamaha petcock looks to be the one to the right of the 450 footpegs, the other near the brake disc looks to be for the 450. Your pictures don't zoom in as much as some so I'm educatedly guessing. You got the later style kickstart lever that articulates at the bottom, and you got a nearly pristine alternator cover, a rarity these days. Mine was shifter-gouged pretty badly.
You win the petcock contest, no prize but praise an accolades! Yes I was happy with items that I have already seen such as the alternator cover, mine appears to be have a hairline crack. Also I was happy to see that it has a good shifter spindle as mine is broke off from rust where it come through the drive chain cover. They are non existent on ebay or the other sites such as David Silver, CMSNL, ect. I did find where you can order a new reproduction one for either the K0 or the K1-K5 from a vendor in the Netherlands but as you can imagine they are very proud of them. Here is the link if anyone really needs one. https://www.cb450.nl/shop/honda-cb450k-gear-shift-spindle/ I am sure there will be more that I can use as I get further in this project.
 
Wow, a single unwhacked left fork ear. Ureka! And a 40 hole rear wheel.
Yes I was really excited when I got home and was able to dig through the tote and boxes and get a good look at the loot. The fork ear is the one I need as mine looks more like an accordion from the accident on that side. BTW does any body know what the set of black fork ears look like they go to? There are obviously a few things that in the pile that not for 72 CB450 but I admit to not being able to identify everything with out comparison or finding a part number.I am also hoping the rear wheel matches my bike as it is in much with a lot less rust. :)
 
You win the petcock contest, no prize but praise an accolades! Yes I was happy with items that I have already seen such as the alternator cover, mine appears to be have a hairline crack. Also I was happy to see that it has a good shifter spindle as mine is broke off from rust where it come through the drive chain cover. They are non existent on ebay or the other sites such as David Silver, CMSNL, ect. I did find where you can order a new reproduction one for either the K0 or the K1-K5 from a vendor in the Netherlands but as you can imagine they are very proud of them. Here is the link if anyone really needs one. https://www.cb450.nl/shop/honda-cb450k-gear-shift-spindle/ I am sure there will be more that I can use as I get further in this project.
So you're the one waiting endlessly for a good answer about SeaBee at HT... and by now I thought you learned that you'll get more and faster responses here at VHT than you will ever get at that now-corporate dump. The owner of Sea Bee is a member here, though he hasn't been back in 2.5 years. I discovered Sea Bee while on a FB 450 group, their parts are legit but a bit pricey and of course, expensive shipping from NL too.
 
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I am also hoping the rear wheel matches my bike as it is in much with a lot less rust. :)
If the brake panel in the other photo is any indication then the rear wheel should fit your bike. I bet I have a key that fits the ignition switch in your pile of parts.
 
So you're the one waiting endlessly for a good answer about SeaBee at HT... and by now I thought you learned that you'll get more and faster responses here at VHT than you will ever get at that now-corporate dump. The owner of Sea Bee is a member here, though he hasn't been back in 2.5 years. I discovered Sea Bee while on a FB 450 group, their parts are legit but a bit pricey and of course, expensive shipping from NL too.
Yes that is me at HT and I was kindly directed to VHT by crazypj.
 
That right rear brake panel might make a good base for a shop lamp, but that's probably it - looks to be missing half of the ear for the stopper arm.

If you need one, I've got a spare I think. It's in need of some deep cleaning and polish. I'll never need it - if the one I have now goes, it's time for rear disks.

Wiring harness is really helpful to figure out trim lengths and placement, the wires themselves are likely useless, and if you convert to LED lighting, you can thin out that harness pretty fast.

I'd get that carb soaking now - if the brass is still inside and serviceable, it may be worth more than gold right now. I'm mostly curious what the innards of that donor motor's head looks like. Those are a ton of parts that are almost impossible to find, or $$$.

.
 
If the brake panel in the other photo is any indication then the rear wheel should fit your bike. I bet I have a key that fits the ignition switch in your pile of parts.
That right rear brake panel might make a good base for a shop lamp, but that's probably it - looks to be missing half of the ear for the stopper arm.

If you need one, I've got a spare I think. It's in need of some deep cleaning and polish. I'll never need it - if the one I have now goes, it's time for rear disks.

Wiring harness is really helpful to figure out trim lengths and placement, the wires themselves are likely useless, and if you convert to LED lighting, you can thin out that harness pretty fast.

I'd get that carb soaking now - if the brass is still inside and serviceable, it may be worth more than gold right now. I'm mostly curious what the innards of that donor motor's head looks like. Those are a ton of parts that are almost impossible to find, or $$$.

.
Yes the brake panel is busted up pretty bad but I think the one that is on the bike I bought is in good shape but I appreciate the offer. Yep the wiring harness is a find just for the reason you mention. Also while I can read a wiring diagram pretty well it is really helpful to have an extra one to be able to physically work with. I was really happy to see the extra carb and at least from the exterior it looks in really good shape.
 
If the brake panel in the other photo is any indication then the rear wheel should fit your bike. I bet I have a key that fits the ignition switch in your pile of parts.
Yes I would be interested in finding a key that would fit the ignition switch and seat lock on on my restoration bike or at least the spare one so would appreciate if you have a key that you think would work. I can PM you so we can discuss if that works.
 
Yes I would be interested in finding a key that would fit the ignition switch and seat lock on on my restoration bike or at least the spare one so would appreciate if you have a key that you think would work. I can PM you so we can discuss if that works.
Chris will need the T-number off the ignition switch, seat lock or fork lock cylinder. Back then it should be right out in the open on your ignition switch (before they started putting the numbers on the back or elsewhere due to thieves just buying keys) so hopefully you have the easy search. If not, look on the end of the cylinder in the seat lock.

key number.jpg
 
Chris will need the T-number off the ignition switch, seat lock or fork lock cylinder. Back then it should be right out in the open on your ignition switch (before they started putting the numbers on the back or elsewhere due to thieves just buying keys) so hopefully you have the easy search. If not, look on the end of the cylinder in the seat lock.

View attachment 29566
Thanks for the heads up and I will check the numbers tomorrow. I am hoping they are all a set although I will not bet any money on it.
 
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